Proceedings of the Meghalaya Legislative Assembly assembled after the first General Election, 1972

The Assembly met in the Assembly Chamber, Shillong on 4th April, 1973 1973, at 9 A.M. with the Hon'ble Speaker in the Chair.

Mr. Speaker  :-  Let us being with the business of the day be taking up Starred Questions

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

STARRED QUESTIONS

(To which oral replies were given)

Re-construction and improvement of Primary Middle and High School
Buildings of Border in Garo Hills.

Shri Nimosh Sangma  asked :

*40

Will the Minister-in-charge of Education be pleased to state -

 

(a) Whether Government has taken any step to help re-construction and improvement of Primary, Middle and High School Buildings of Border Areas, in Garo Hills, which were damaged during the refugee influx in 1971 ?

 

(b) If so, the names of these schools and how much has been sanctioned for each ?

Shri D.D. Pugh (Minister, of State, Education) replied :

40

(a) -Yes, Sir.

 

(b) -1. Rongrikingiri Government Aided M.E. School -

Building

...

...

...

...

...

Rs. 2,275

Hostel

...

...

...

...

...

Rs. 2,000

2. Kapasipa Government Aided M..E. School.

Building

...

...

...

...

...

Rs. 1,200

3. Muna Bari Government Aided M.E. School

Building

...

...

...

...

...

Rs. 1,000

4. Sibbari Government M.E. School    

Building

...

...

...

...

...

Rs. 2,000

Total

Rs. 8,475.

        Starred Question No. 41 (not put up the member being absent).

Transfer the Services of Schools to District Council

Shri Nimosh Sangma asked :

*42

Will the Minister-in-charge of Education be pleased to state - 

 

(a) Whether it is a fact that Government propose to transfer the services of Sub-Inspector of Schools to District Council ?

 

(b) If so, when ?

Shri D.D. Pugh ( Minister of State, Education)  replied :

*42

(a) -Yes Sir, Government has decided to place the services of Sub-Inspectors of Schools on deputation to the District Councils.

 

(b) -The implementation of the decision is being processed.

Shri Nimosh Sangma :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, may we know the date when the services will be transferred to the District Council ?

Shri D.D. Pugh (Minister of State, Education) :-  I have said already that implementation of the decision is being processed.

Shri. Nimosh Sangma :- May I know the date ?

Mr. Speaker :-  When the matter is still under process how can the Minister give the date ?

Supply of Electricity Power by the Shillong Hydro Electric 

Shri P.R. Kyndiah  asked :

*43

Will the Minister in-charge of Power (electricity) be passed to state -

 

(a) Whether Government is aware of the fact that the supply of Electricity Power by the Shillong Hydro Electric Ltd., is extremely poor and erratic ?

 

(b) If so, what are the steps taken up by the Government ?

 

(c) What are the terms and conditions of license granted to the said Company ?

 

(d) Whether Government is considering taking over the management of Company ?

Shri. S.D.D. Nichols Roy [Minister, Power (Electricity)] replied :

43

(a) -No, It is , however, true that power supply is not up to the mark and there have been occasional interruptions in power supply

 

(b) -Government has granted a license to the Company incorporating certain clause for improvement of power supply. The Company has placed one Jeep in the Head Office to tackle all emergency and long distance calls. Duty Staff at the sub-stations have been instructed to attend to the consumers' complaints promptly.

 

(c) -A copy of the license is placed on the table of the House.

 

(d) -No.

Shri P. Ripple Kyndiah :-  Whether the Government is aware that in spite of some steps being taken there was not so much improvement ?

Shri S.D.D. Nichols- Roy (Minister, Power etc.) :-  I am not aware of what the previous Government had done.

Shri Maham Singh :-  Whether the Government is aware that the Company is supplying power much below the voltage required.

Shri S.D.D. Nichols- Roy (Minister, Power etc.) :- We have been informed that voltage drop in certain areas of the town was due to old transmission line.

Shri Maham Singh :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir,  whether the Government considering some steps to see that the power is supplied with correct voltage.

Shri S.D.D. Nichols- Roy (Minister, Power etc.) :-  Yes, Sir, in view of the low voltage due to old and long transmission line, we have had a discussion with the Company's authority  and they assured  that more transmission lines would be installed so that power  would be supplied with correct voltage.


Announcement by the Speaker :

Mr. Speaker :-  Before we pass on to other item, I have some announcement to make. I have received a letter from the leader of the Congress Parliamentary Party, Mr. Maham Singh, this morning informing me that Mr. Edward Kurbah and Mr. Lewis Bareh have joined the Congress Parliamentary group and as such number of Members constituting the Congress Parliamentary group has increased to ten and according to our rules, the Congress Parliamentary Party will be recognised from today as the official Opposition Party inside the House. Mr. Maham Singh has been declared as the Official Leader of the  Opposition Party. I am really very happy that only after 3 years we have got a really Opposition Party inside the House. I hope from today onwards the functioning of Parliamentary democracy inside the House will really be effective and it will be to my advantage that we have both a Leader of the House and a Leader of the Opposition to assist me in all works that I have to undertake inside and outside the House as Speaker of this august House.

        "Now the second information that I want to pass on to the House is that I have receive a letter from Shri H. Hadem addressed to the Secretary, United Independent Parliamentary Party of the Meghalaya Legislative Assembly, with a copy to me, informing me that from today he is no longer a Member of the United Independent Parliamentary Party. In the meantime I have also received a complaint from Mr. H. Hadem which reads as follows :-

        To the Secretary, Meghalaya legislative Assembly Shillong.

Sir,

    I have the honour to bring to your notice a serious complaint as follows :-

        1. That on the 29th April, 1973 - Shri Martin Narayan Majaw M.L.A. sent a telegram to the Prime Minister of India regarding the demonstrators from Border areas.

        2. That Shri Martin Narayan Majaw, M.L.A. in the said telegram, had signed my name without my consent.

        3. That the said action of Shri Martin Narayan Majaw, M.L.A. by singing and including my name without my consent severely hurt me and cast reflection on my privilege as the member of the House.

        In the circumstances, I bring this matter to your notice praying for your necessary action and intervention of the House against the said hon. Member, Shri Martin Narayan Majaw.

 

 Yours faithfully,

 

Sd/- H. HADEM

Dated Shillong, 

Member

4th April, 1973

Meghalaya Legislative Assembly.

Mr. Speaker :-  Before I make a decision on this matter, may I ask Mr. Hadem to make a submission.

Shri Humphrey Hadem :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, I have nothing more to add than what I have already written in my petition. But, actually I would like to bring to your kind notice that the 29th of March, 1973 was recess day and on that day, Sir, I was out of Shillong having to attend one Committee in our Development Block at Shangpung. But on the 30th evening if I remember aright, while I attended a dinner party in Pinewood Hotel on that very night, I learnt that my name has been included in the telegram, which did not even know that there has been such a telegram". So, I tried to verify and only yesterday I found that what has been told to me on that night was correct. As such, I feel very much humiliated, Sir, by signing my name and including it in the telegram without my consent. So, Sir, I request your kind action according to rules.

Mr. Speaker :-  In the meantime, I have received a letter from Prof. M.N. Majaw. The letter runs as follows:-

"Mr. H. Hadem, M.L.A.,

The 4th April, 1973

Shillong  

Dear Mr. Hadem,

        May I offer you my unqualified apologies and sincere regret for including your name inadvertently in the telegram sent to Delhi on the Border Demonstration.

        Please accept my apologies.

 Thank you,

Yours Sincerely,

Sd/- Prof. M.N. Majaw, M.L.A.

Copy to the Speaker, Meghalaya Legislative Assembly, Shillong
Sd/- Prof. M.N. Majaw.

        Now, may I ask Mr. Hadem what is his reaction to this letter. Otherwise I have no other alternative but to refer the matter to the Privilege Committee.

Shri H. Hadem :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, I have also just received it. For this matter, I have had no sleep (laughter) for the whole night, yesterday. I may need two more sleepless night Sir, before I can again give my opinion (laughter). So, since I have received the letter just now, I cannot, at the moment give my comment on it.

Mr. Speaker :- That means you do not accept the apology at the moment ?

Shri H. Hadem :- Sir, probably, it will take another sleepless night (laughter) and at this moment I cannot say anything.

Mr. Speaker :-  The matter concerning the privileges of the Members is always a serious matter, specially when the incident occurred during the session of the Assembly and that the telegram was typed within the precincts of the House. So, in the meantime, in order to give a chance to  Mr. Hadem to rethink over the unqualified apologies of Prof. M.N. Majaw, I do not want that the matter should be discussed since it concerns the hon. Member. The matter may be referred to the Privilege Committee which will go into the details of the complaint and if no amicable settlement can be arrived at between the two hon. Members, it may be at in the presence of the members of the Privilege Committee and the matter may be dropped. But of course if Mr. Hadem will not be able to accept it the Privilege Committee will have to go into the details of the complaint or to give the hon. Member a chance to explain himself more fully and to give Prof. Majaw a chance to explain himself. So, the matter is referred to the Privilege Committee

Shri Pritington Sangma :- Mr. Speaker Sir, I want to have another clarification. Last time during the current session itself the hon. Member from Mawhati exhibited live rifle bullets in the House and when the Chief Minister had asked whether the hon. Member had any licence for the ammunitions, no specific reply was given. So, I want to know whether this action constitutes a breach of privilege of the House ?

Mr. Speaker :-  The whole question centres round whether the hon. Member brought the bullets with the full intention of intimidating the House or not. At any rate to bring the bullets inside the House is a serious matter. I did not give my ruling on that day since the matter has been brought on the floor of the House. Now, this matter will have to be looked into by the Privilege Committee because it concerns the behaviour of the same hon. Member. I, therefore, refer this matter to the Privilege Committee for examination and report by the time when the next session begins. Now, we will pass on to the second item of business. May I ask the Chief Minister to beg leave to introduce the Meghalaya Finance Bill, 1973.

Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg leave to introduce the Meghalaya Finance Bill, 1973

Mr. Speaker :-  Motion moved. Now, I put the question before the House. The question is that leave be granted to introduce the Meghalaya Finance Bill, 1973.

        The motion is carried. Leave is granted.

        Before the Chief Minister introduces the Bill, let me read the message from the Governor.

"Raj Bhavan

Shillong

        Under the provision of Article 207 (1) of the Constitution of India, I Braj Kumar Nehru, Governor of Meghalaya, recommend the introduction of the Meghalaya Finance Bill, 1973, in the Meghalaya Legislative Assembly.

Sd/- B.K. Nehru,

Governor"

        May I ask the Chief Minister to introduce the Bill ?

Shri W. A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg leave to introduce the Bill.

Mr. Speaker :-  Motion moved. Now, I put the question before the House. The question is that the Meghalaya Finance Bill 1973, be introduced.

        The motion is carried. The Bill is introduced.

        (The Secretary read out the tile of the Bill)        

        Now, we will pass on to the next item - Motions.

        We have completed Motion No. 1 and Motion No. 2. Now, Mr. Khongwir to move Motion No. 3.


Points of order

Shri H. Hadem :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, I would like to raise a point of order on the this particular matter and, that is, regarding the admissibility of this motion. Probably this motion was admitted by your honour before the Assembly meets. But according to Rule, 131, clause (3), item (vi), a motion to be admissible shall not revive discussion of a matter which has been discussed in the same session. The particular matter has been discussed during the general discussion of the budget and during the cut motions on the demands for grants. So, I want to know whether in the same session, this motion can still be admitted ?

Ruling by the Speaker :-

Mr. Speaker :-  In fact, the motions has  been admitted long before the reply to the debate on the Governor's Address and the general discussion of the budget, but since we have had a through discussion on this matter and also  a through reply on the subject, I disallow this motion. Let us come to Motion No.4 to be moved by Mr. P.R. Kyndiah.

Motions

Shri P.R. Kyndiah :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg to move that this Assembly do now discuss about the unemployment problem particularly in  respect of unemployed youth in the State.

Shri E. Bareh (Minister, Revenue) :- May I raise a point of order Here also this motion relates to the same matter which we have already had a discussion in general and also in the cut motions.

Prof. M.N. Majaw :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, I want to shed a light on that clarification. If my memory serves me right, there was a move on that day when we were talking about the unemployment problem and the employment policy that the two motions should be clubbed together and that it was a proposal from the hon. Member from Jaiaw to club together Motions No.2 and No.4. But after our submission to the Deputy  Speaker who was in the Chair, it was decided that those items should be treated as separate issues.

Mr. Speaker :-  I will treat it as a special issue if Mr. Kyndiah can bring out some light which may differ from Motion No. 2.

Shri P.R. Kyndiah :-  Just to enlighten the point, Sir, It was understood that day, in fact as the hon. Member from Mawhati has mentioned I was raising a point in clubbing together the motions which stood in the name of Mr. Khongwir and myself. But the matter was discussed that my motion is concerned mostly with the problem of unemployment and not a policy matter. Therefore the ruling of the Deputy Speaker was in favour to move my motion after sometime. Therefore with your permission I would like to continue.

Shri H. Hadem :-  There was a point of order raised by the Hon'ble Minister which has not been disposed of.

Mr. Speaker :-  The Hon'ble Minister has raised a point of order on the motion that this problem was already discussed on the previous occasion. But I said I will allow the motion provided Mr. Kyndiah can bring out some new light in the matter. If it is the same, I will disallow

Shri P.R. Kyndiah :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, it is very clear in my motion that my intention is to discuss about this problem of unemployment in general affecting the whole State and a particularly in respect of the unemployment youths. Now I will deal first with the first part of the motion. As we are all aware, the unemployment problem is an all India phenomenon. It is not only a problem affecting our State, but it is an admitted fact that although the unemployment problem follow the All India pattern, yet in our State the problem has assumed an acute form. Now in order to convince myself that this problem is very acute in our State...........

Mr. Speaker :-  Do not try to convince yourself. Convince the House and convince me at least.

Shri P.R. Kyndiah :-  Myself and yourself and the whole House I will not refer to the basis of the remark to the approach paper of the 5th Five Year Plan in which it is mentioned that the phenomenon of unemployment and price rise have taken their turns in acute form in Meghalaya. The growth of unemployment in Meghalaya had been on a faster phase. In the absence of proper machinery, the percentage and the absolute number of unemployed cannot be quoted now. This in itself has emphasized the acuteness of this problem and also the unemployment growth is at a faster phase. The census of 1971 reveals that the workers constituted 44.16 percent of the population and in the census of 1971, it was 4.5 lakhs. Therefore from this it can be made out that a good percentage of the population of the State is without employment. Now again, in the approach paper of the 5th Five Year Plan, page 8, there is a mention that the back-log of unemployed is taken approximately at 1 lakh and the employment generation will have to be around 1.56 per cent lakhs. Now Mr. Speaker, Sir, my point for elucidating my remark is to pin-point that the unemployment problem here in our State certainly is running at a faster rate. It is in fact very alarming. I remember that even a few years ago just at the time when the Autonomous State came into being. When the Government had advertised for posts of L.D.A.s for some posts and vacancies, the number of applications came to 4,000. This in itself proved that the unemployment problem has assumed an alarming proportion. We know that this problem especially in the rural area, if it not tackled in an effective manner, it will have far reaching consequences on the economy of the State. Now everyone knows very well that the educated youths of the State are facing great hardships for not getting employment avenues and unless effective measures are taken; I am afraid, Mr. Speaker, Sir, that this problem will bring a sense of frustration among the youth......


Remarks by the  Speaker

Mr. Speaker :-  I have understood Mr. Kyndiah. I think it is time that I should give my ruling. I will admit this motion only on two items that the House will discuss only the unemployment problem in the rural areas and the problems of the educated unemployed youths in the State. These are two aspects. The other general aspects were already discussed in motion No.2


Privilege Motion

        Now, we will come to a most interesting item. The House may recall that yesterday a resolution was passed to the effect that a warrant of arrest of Prof. Kapila Chatterjee be issued as he was  reported to have refused to receive the summons directing  him to appear before the Bar of the  House to-day to receive the reprimand of the House. Prof. Chatterjee however, came of his own accord to my Chamber yesterday at about 2. P.M. to receive the summon personally. Let me remind the hon. Members that this House has already decided upon the sentence to be pronounced on Prof. Chatterjee. The Privilege Committee had recommended for reprimanding Prof. Chatterjee and the House has already agreed to it. There will be no more need for this august House to afford any opportunity to Prof. Chatterjee to explain himself or to further deliberate on this issue. I urge upon the hon. Members to maintain silence when Prof. Chatterjee is brought to the Bar of the House to be reprimanded. It will be a solemn occasion and your silence at this moment will add more  to the solemnity of the occasion and lay more emphasis on the authority of the House. I will now direct the Marshal to conduct Prof. Chatterjee to the Bar of the House.

        (Prof. Chatterjee was brought in by the Marshal). Will you let the House know if your name of Prof. Kapila Chatterjee ?

Prof. Kapila Chatterjee :-  Yes, Mr. Speaker, Sir.

Mr. Speaker :-  Are you the Editor, Publisher and Printer of the Young-India, an English Weekly published from Shillong.

Prof. Kapila Chatterjee :-  Yes, Mr. Speaker, Sir,

Mr. Speaker :- Did you publish in your paper the news-item under the headline. "The Bark of Ignorant  Mischievous Politicians" ?

Prof. Kapila Chatterjee :-  Yes, Mr. Speaker, Sir,

Mr. Speaker :-  That was on the 13th April, 1972 and an Editorial  caption)" "Privilege of Legislators and Assemblies" which appeared on the issue of the said paper dated 22nd June, 1972 ?

Prof. Chatterjee :-  Yes, Mr. Speaker, Sir,.

Mr. Speaker :-  Now let me read out to the whole House some portions of the writing of Prof. Chatterjee "the Bark of Ignorant Mischievous Politicians. The Meghalaya Legislative Assembly has once again passed the infamous Meghalaya Land Transfer Act with the full approval and massive support of most of the Opposition members also, specially the Leaders of the Hill State Peoples Democratic Party and the dumb silence of the pseudo-Congress members, with the notable and brilliant exception of  Dhrubanath Joshi (Congress) who voiced his severe opposition to the Black Act.

        The Land Transfer Act which puts serious restrictions on the  transfer of land in Meghalaya from "tribal" to "non-tribal" on any plea even gifts, is the most obnoxious piece of legislation that any responsible legislature of India" can enact. We know that the so-called "sacred Constitution of India" is now no better than a scrap of paper, to be changed and twisted at will by the dictatorial power of the "sovereign"  Parliament. In that case there was no earthly reason in having a high sounding set of Fundamental Rights for the Indian Citizen. Where in INDIA  in all this ? The redoubtable champion of tribal interests, Hoover Hynniewta raised his stentorian voice in the Meghalaya Assembly last week saying that if the Land Transfer Act were not passed, the non-tribals like Bengalis, Nepalese and Assamese would buy up all the tribal land and wipe out the tribals and the hill people would become extinct like the Bengalis have done in Tripura.

        We admire the crass and colossal ignorance of this great legislator and congratulate him for thus airing his profound knowledge of what India is NOT, and also showing up in bright colors the brilliant exposition of Indian Culture as taught him and his type by the very tribal foreign missionaries in their educational institutions which have covered tribals land during British rule. Let these champions of tribal interests (which happen to be their own selfish interest) know that Indian culture and Indian Political philosophy have never throughout the countless ages of Indian history countenanced the wiping out of annihilation of a single cultural or ethnic group anywhere in the land. It is the special feature of Indian culture to embrace all cultures as its own and this explains the quality of India as being a land of unity in the midst of diversity. If Indian culture aimed at annihilating any group of culture there would have been no diversity in the country and we would have had a European pattern of socio-political life in India. Let the champions of separatism and mutual suspicion learn their first lesson in Indian culture before they was eloquent on false and imaginary fears of being wiped out and made extinct by their own fellow Indians. The irresponsible reference to Tripura is the height of wickedness and impertinence, as no such things has happened in Tripura as Hoover Hynniewta said on the floor of Meghalaya Assembly. This is a canard that must be challenged and we call upon the people of Tripura to give the lie direct to such evil, and mischievous propaganda by scheming and wicked Politicians. These vile fellows masquerading as a responsible political leaders are in reality mischief-makers who are trying to fan up separatist movement in this already sensitive area of North East India". Then you go on- "Now Hoover Hynniewta, the H.S.P.D.P. and A.P.H.L.C. are playing the same dangerous game in India and instigating one Indian against another on the preposterous plea that a non-tribal Indian will exterminate a tribal Indian. We raise our voice in full-throated protest against this type of speech inside an Assembly of constituent part of India and against this sort of evil, narrow minded, separatist, hat red-ridden mentality, and demand that short shrift be made of such traitors to the Indian nation".

        Let me pass on now to another writing. I am quoting certain paragraphs from the same paper published on 22nd June, 1972. He wrote an editorial under the title "Privileges of Legislators and Assemblies". "We Indians are never tired of copying the British and their outward forms of behaviour, drinking liquor, dressing in the smartest of English clothes and trying to be black Englishmen, but in character and the spirit of national patriotism we are as far removed from the British whom we ape, than the north from the south pole. One such instance is that of privileges of M.L.As. M.Ps and the Parliament or State Legislative Assemblies. How touchy are our elected Legislators about their privileges. It makes us both weep and laugh. Fellows who come with bended knee to us, the voters, before the elections for our vote, suddenly develop a special privilege of being superior to all of us and flaunting their power at our faces treating the common people like dogs to be whipped and kicked when occasion demands for the protection of these legislators' and their blasted House's dignity and prestige against public criticism. We refer to the British Parliament and take shelter behind this Mother of Parliaments forgetting that in England the politicians and the nation in general are by nature public-spirited and patriotic, while we blessed Indians are certainly not. Besides, why have such special privileges for any class of citizens at all ? When it is a question of Brahmans and 'Caste Hindus' then of course  all the venom of socialist democracy is spat on the Hindus. But when politician become privileged castes and spread all kinds of evil among the people they are protected in all their vile acts and statements by a law of privilege, the dignity of the Houses. Then I will read another paragraph. We are indeed grateful to Shri. Khongwir for his touchiness about privileges and dignity of the Houses. But may we ask when responsible politicians elected by the people talk at random fanning up one section of Indians against another by utterly irresponsible and ill-informed statements as Shri Hoover did in the Meghalaya Assembly in April, 1972, are the gentlemen of the Press expected to keep mum and swallow these magnificent effusions of lofty nobility and undiluted patriotism because these splendid words issued like nectar from the inspired lips of politicians who is, perhaps, not very much more learned than the general public or the editors of poor newspapers ?". Then I pass on to another paragraph. We may remind the honourable member that 'Young India' was hauled up by the Privileges Committee of the Assam, Assembly in 1960 and the editor had to suffer the punishment of not being given a Press Gallery card for the Assam Assembly till to-day. But Young Indians offence was that it criticised the Assembly for not referring to the laughter of one section of citizens in the disgraceful riots in Assam during 1960. Imagine at paper which exposes the utter incompetence of a Government is accused to insulting the dignity of a House that was really guilty of grave dereliction of its primary duty of protecting the citizens of the State from violent attracts of civilized goondas. The Meghalaya Assembly has been given the honour and "Young India" the special privilege of being the first newspaper of this new born State to be accused of a breach of privilege. But we will not be cowed down even if our voice is gagged today, one day it shall be heard when the din of screeching selfish scheming politicians is silenced for ever". Are these your words ?

Prof. Kapila Chatterjee :-  Yes, Mr. Speaker, Sir, 

Mr. Speaker :-  Prof. Kapila Chatterjee, the House has adjudged you guilty of committing a gross breach of privilege and contempt of the House for publishing a libelous news-item under the caption "The bark of ignorant mischievous politicians," and an equally defamatory editorial with the heading "Privileges of Legislators and Assemblies", in the issues dated 13th April, 1972 and the 22nd June, 1972 respectively, of "Young India" of which your are the Editor, Printer and Publisher. Those articles were libelous in their tenor and content and they were a contempt of this august House and a gross affront to its members, particularly Shri S.D. Khongwir and Shri Hoover Hynniewta. As Editor you had a high responsibility and  it  was excepted of you to exercise utmost caution and discretion in publishing such articles. You were fully aware of the traditions of the Legislatures, yet you published words calculated to tarnish this august House and bring its members into odium, contempt and ridicule. This offence of yours was all the more aggravated by the nature of explanation you chose to submit to the Committee of Privileges. In the name of the House, I reprimand you  for committing a gross breach of privilege and contempt of the House and now I order you to bow to the chair and to the two sides of the House.

        (Prof. Kapila Chatterjee bowed down first to the Chair and than to the two sides of the House).

        I now order you to withdraw. 

        (At this stage Prof. Kapila Chatterjee withdraw).

Mr. Speaker :-  Now, Mr. Kyndiah to move his motion.

        (At this stage the Speaker left the Chamber and the Deputy Speaker took the Chair)


Motions

Shri P.R. Kyndiah :-  Mr. Deputy Speaker Sir, I was making a remark that the unemployment problem has assumed an alarming proportion. The basis on which I made this remark is one the basis of the extracts from the Approach to the Fifth Five Year Plan and the experiences that we have had from time to time . For most of us, the Members who represent the urban constituencies, we know that every day we are getting representation from the educated unemployed for getting this job or the other. We also know that thousands of them are coming from schools and colleges to fill the employment markets. In many instances, we know of Masters of Arts or Bachelor of Arts who were even trying to get a job as Peon or Lower grade posts. All this goes to show that the problem of getting jobs for the educated unemployed is extremely acute. Now, even when we  refer to the problem of unemployment in the rural areas I submit, Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, that it is because of the tardiness in the economy in the State coupled with conservatism of the people, but primarily because of certain other factors like the closure of the border markets and the inability to provide opportunities to generate employment. It is because of these factors that the unemployment problem in the rural areas has also assumed an alarming proportion. In any case, Mr. Deputy Speaker Sir, in the absence of statistics we can only guest the acuteness of this problem. We have had the occasion to express ourselves on the floor of this House about the enormity of this problem, the problem being so colossal, that we had admitted in in certain measure, that we cannot just cope with this problem right way. But I beg to submit Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, enormous as the problem, difficult as the problem is, I believe it is the duty of the Government primarily to have or indicate an approach to this problem. Generally speaking, most of the people of Meghalaya live in villages. We know that 85.46 per cent of the population lives in the rural areas and also having fantastic number of 5028 villages. The average population of a village is 186 only. Now this perspective of the condition in the rural areas has to be borne in mind. 85 per cent or more live in the villages. Therefore, if you want to tackle this problem of unemployment it has to be rural oriented which means infact that we have to open up opportunities for the villagers where the average population is only 186 and we have to generate employment in such a way as to be able to absorb the stocks of employment. this is one way of approach. The other approach is with regard to urban unemployment. As I have indicated, this problem being so acute that the young men coming out of colleges and schools do not get jobs and they are facing difficulty and also experiencing a sense of frustration. Now, unless this problem can be comprehended and appreciated in a proper way, I am afraid that a day will come when the problem will be too large and impossible for us to effect any solution. Now we know of the experiences in other places like West Bengal and other States, that this urban unemployment, when it has assumed a proportion of this nature, the educated youths turn their minds towards something else as a result of which we see Naxalism in Calcutta and other cities of the country and here also in Shillong and other town like Tura and Jowai, if we do not take measures to open up opportunities for the educated youths I am afraid that the minds of our youths will be diverted towards destructive lines. Therefore, it is important that we appreciate this problem now. I am fully aware that the Government  cannot tackle the problem alone and the employment opportunities opened up by the Government cannot meet demand. I am fully aware of the fact but what is important is that we should appreciate the system that we are in; we are under a system which is the Welfare State. The Government is wedded to a socialistic pattern of society and it is the duty of the Government to initiate action by which the employment opportunities will be generated. Now, I have had the occasion, fortunately for us who represent the urban constituencies, to meet a number of groups of educated unemployed and far from what I thought to be, I have had the impression earlier that our local boys and girls are allergic to enterprises, business and the sort. But my experience now have led me to believe that given the capital, given the opportunities and training, our youths will be able to compete and go for other avocations like trade, commerce and the likes. So here is a question of the Government coming in to render facilities to the educated youths to solve this problem. Of course, I would also like to add that all these years, unfortunately for us, the State of Meghalaya was not in existence and in most of the other offices, other than the State Government Offices, the Central Offices and other establishments in Shillong and in other towns, no opportunities or reservation were given to the local people. But now I feel it right and proper that for all vacancies that occur in the Central Offices and other establishments the proportion has to be earmarked for the local people and I think the Government has great responsibilities to see that this is taken up as a matter of policy. The other approach I would like to place before the House, although I am fully seized of this problem, I feel sometimes that we should create avenues of employment and give employment to the people. But at the same time, we should not lose our balance. I also feel that we should not adopt that attitude of creating employment just for the sake of employment but we have to create employment with a view to creating assets like roads and bridges minor irrigation works and so on and also employment should be created according to the needs. Now we  know very well the needs of our people in so far as the rural areas mostly are concerned. Their needs are mostly concerned with marketing of their produces whether  in the field of industry, agriculture, trade and commerce. But at the same time the employment generation that has to be made according to the needs. So, Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, the picture comes under two categories, in so far as rural unemployment is concerned and under this category, we have got plenty of lands, agricultural lands and forest lands and these lands can be exploited with a view to affording employment opportunities to the people. But in so far as the urban employment is concerned, now to the time for our people to concentrate not only in their services, but on trade, commerce and other business. Now in regard to development of industries, the Government has taken up development schemes and transport operation. This of cause affects most of the rural population and urban population. Nevertheless, these are very important aspects of employment generation. Now, the Finance Minister and the Governor in the their speeches, have mentioned about the attitude of the Government and their approach towards this problem They have made a mention that it is the intention of the Government to tackle this unemployment problem and they have also decided to appoint a State Man-power Officer whose duties will be to find out avenues of employment and then arrange for training and ensuring fuller opportunity to the educated youth in the State, both rural and urban. I believe it will take up this matter very soon because this is a very very important matter and I believe all of us are also concerned in this matter. I  also feel that one of the most important aspects of employment is exploitation of land. Now we have got a population of 10 lakhs with the total surface area  of 22,500 kilometres and the density of our population is less, only 45 per sq.  Kilometer. Here I would like to give a few suggestions. As well all know, potato is a very important crop that is produced in Khasi Hills District and I am very happy to know that the Government through Small Farmers, Development Agency has  taken up a new scheme to help the small farmers and labourers in the Mawryngkneng Development Block who have been greatly benefited from it. I am sure this scheme will extend to other Blocks and I believe this will enhance the economy of the State especially if the people are more keen to adopt this kinds of schemes. But there is also the marketing problem of potato. If I am not mistaken I remember during the last Session, there was suggestion that potato trade has to be taken over by the Government. It is a great progressive measure to get the potato production taken over  by the Government and it may be a very good thing. Personally speaking, in regard to potato trade, if the Government forms a Potato Trade Corporation, its duties will be to create incentives and opportunities for marketing and also to act as a catalyst to check prices and to prevent the exploitation of potato farmers. So I would suggest, Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, through you, that the Government should seriously consider the setting up of Potato Trade Corporation. I hope this will provide employment opportunities to our people as well as the growers. At the same time, we can also go in for growing ginger in Garo Hills. Now with regard to forest lands, we have not been able to exploit scientifically our forests. I have had an occasion to discuss with some officials to the Reserve Bank of India who had indicated the idea of regeneration with a view to bringing in employment to the people and also to conserve the forest wealth of the State. In so far as farming is concerned I have had the occasion to take to some of the educated youths both urban and rural sides, and I have been very much encouraged by the idea of going in for farming either cattle or sheep or poultry or piggery farming. But the whole sang is how to approach this problem linking up the Government and the people. Now I would humbly submit that the Government should encourage the educated youths of the State to take up this lines.

        Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, it will not be so simple but I think if the Government considers to take up the various schemes as done by some other State, perhaps, we can develop this educated man-power to the agricultural-based and farm-based employment. Now, I would like to share with the House about certain schemes implemented by some States, I think perhaps it must be Jammu & Kashmir. Now, in Jammu and Kashmir they are having some schemes to give employment to the educated unemployed youths. This scheme so simple in its concept but far reaching in effect the process is that the Government invites application from the educated youths for undergoing a training in certain trades vocations for specific period say 12 months or 15 months. Then the applicants apply, and the Government interviews them and if found fit, they have to undergo certain training whether in poultry, piggery and others. After pinpointing the trainee about his inclination in the trade, the Government gives him a  stipend to enable him to undertake such training for a definite period of 1 or 2  years or 15  months. After coming out from the training having had enough experiences, got the manageable training and also the technical training now, the young man is given the opportunity to start his vocation that he has chosen and specialised. The young man is then provided with a stipend of Rs.200 approximately or it may be less according to the rules and regulations as laid down by the Government and at this stage the Government will come forward with guarantee so that he is able to take loan from the financial institution, like banks. After a certain period of time the young man is on his own to stand on his own legs. Now, all  these scheme in Jammu and Kashmir, they have been able to accommodate and employ lakhs of young man and the only thing here is that the Government sponsors the training and stands a guarantee to the banks. I feel that these schemes are very relevant to our State, where most of or educated unemployed youths also come from the villages, they have to go back to their villages after getting training and with necessary capital they can get maximum benefits. After having undergone certain training for a particular period of time they can start their own business in the various fields they have specialised and so it will solve our problem of unemployment of the educated youths to a very great extent. Well these schemes Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, are very good schemes and I feel that our Government also should think very seriously about  the idea. Now, of course as  many of the hon. Members have mentioned the other day that in solving the problem of unemployment of our educated youths, we have also to reorient our educational system. Of course, this is t rue but we have also to take up these various small schemes. In so far as the employment on an urban -based educated youths is concerned, I had the occasion to express before the House about the need to give a fill-up to our unemployed young man to go for trade and commerce. I am a business man myself and I have been able to contact many young men in Shillong particularly, they are not disinclined to go to trade and commerce provided they get necessary capital for the investment. We know very well that in our Khasi Society the young man do not inherit the property they do not have the right to capital and the right of ownership. I have made my suggestion on the floor of the House that there are some portions of land in the Police point in the Police Bazar, there is a vacant place there belonging to a private party. I have suggested that this should be acquired by our Government for the purpose shopping Centre giving a place to the educated tribal youths. First send them for training in any field of trade for a definite period of time and after having had enough knowledge let them start the business of shop keeping. Britain  was a land of shop keepers, but the ruled world once. I would be very happy indeed to see that the unemployed  young men of our State take up shop keeping as their vocation. The only difficulty for them is at the initial stage and then Government will give guarantee through the banking  institutions to start the business of shop-keeping. As you know, shop-keeping is a very simple business, it cannot be a process of hypothecation. If a person will apply for loan he will be given an amount of which he is to contribute 25 per cent or 30 per cent what-ever the case may be, and not only that the Government will also stand guarantee to the lender for that 25 percent. So, if these schemes are taken up I am sure that in Shillong we can give employment to at least 100 by 200 persons. These are also my concrete suggestions that I would like to tender to the Government, and I would appreciate very much  if they can take up these schemes. Another thing Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, regarding unemployment problem and also the venue for employment of our unemployed educated youth is transport operation. The transport operations as a very important avenue to give employment I had a talk with some of the unemployed youths here in Shillong and some of them are agreeable to take up the job of taxi drivers as in the case of Gauhati where the unemployed young men were given some capital and guarantee by the Government through the banks so that they can purchase the taxi or some other vehicles with the money. I think this is a very good step. Of course at present the taxi business is slumped on account of the shifting of the capital at Dispur. I would urge upon our Government also to grant such facilities to our unemployed youths. The other thing I would like to refer is regarding the opening of employment avenues through the Industrial development. I had the occasion to express rather in the forceful manner that we have to go something for the semi educated youth of Shillong and that is about the establishment of the Meter Factory. I have taken up this question on the floor of the House during 1970-71, 1971-72, 1972-73. I am indeed very sorry to know that up till today, the Metre Factory has not been established. My whole idea to have the Metre Factory established is partly from the economic point of view and partly  from the employment point of view and we would like to stress the need that this Meter Factory be established at a very early date. But somehow, Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I do not know what happened to it. The Government should have foreseen the various difficulties and should have taken allied schemes for the production of metres. If we can produce metre we can sell the same in this State and outside and besides giving employment it will fetch revenue to the State Exchequer. The other day, the Hon'ble Finance Minister has made an appeal that in order to solve this problem we have to create a congenial atmosphere so that the educated unemployed youths of this State can have full advantage in securing employment. But Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I would like to inform the House through you, that as we have been situated on the border with Bangladesh. I have always a feeling that it is the duty of the responsible leaders to create a proper and a congenial atmosphere for our youth to take up uniform services whether it is in the Police or in the Army. Army opens up a large opportunity for employing the youths not only in the active service like infantry, army, Air force and the navy but also in the various offices attached to the military establishments. I have always wondered why so few local people have been taken into the various offices attached to the military establishments. I think in view of the problems we are facing, it is right and proper for the Government to explore the avenue in these establishments. There are opportunities for employing clerks, drivers and mechanics in the Air Force, in the Army and so on. Why do we not also have some proportionate representation in them. I feel that the Government can take up this matter more seriously.

        Now, in regard to the Police, of course, we have had the problem because we have taken over long, stock and barrel from the Government of Assam. I do not know how many vacancies are there. But it is good that we are expanding our police. We realise, of course, the financial difficulties in this. But I fee that we are still very much short in the availability of  police personnel. I have had the occasion to discuss with some police officers in the past and I came to know that the number of police personnel is still not adequate to meet  the needs of the State and I think that this will also provide a very big opportunity for our young men to go in. I would even to go the extent of saying that by and by we should create an atmosphere or the psychology in the mind of the people. We should also see and consider whether it is right or whether it is now the opportune time that we should have Army regiment of Meghalaya. I know that our young men will have to be motivated to go for army line. But then the very thought of having a regiment along with the leaders campaign could bring in our youths to this very important service to serve the motherland. I think this is a very important matter and I want the Government to consider this seriously.

        One more point which I would like to bring before the House is with regard to those who have been employed but now have become unemployed. There are many offices, here in Shillong like the Relief & Rehabilitation where the the people have been appointed but have become unemployed at the end of the operations. I am very thankful to the Government for taking a policy decision for absorbing them and most of them have been absorbed. The other day, however, I have been approached by 9 persons who belonged to the Directorate of Census Operations. They were employed here for the last two years or so. But the other day on the 20th of March, the received a notice terminating their services. I do not know how the Government could help them in this matter because this is more or less a Central Government establishment. But I would appeal to the Government to see that these employees are absorbed in the various offices of  Meghalaya. They have already met the Chief Minister, who was kind enough to give the assurance that their cases will be considered. I think that their case deserves consideration and I would be the happiest man if  they could be absorbed is some office of the State. Now, Mr. Deputy Speaker Sir, I do not want to say much. My only appeal to the Government is that my various suggestions that have been given to-day may be taken up with the seriousness that they deserve. 

*Prof. M.N. Majaw :- Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I rise to support the Motion moved by the hon. member from Jaiaw as it concerns matter which needs immediate attention  of the Government and also of all concerned. The difficulties pointed out by the hon. Member are very factual. They have been factually presented. I will not enter into the details geographical, or demographical brought forward by the learned  Member. But I would like to highlight certain points and add some other points of my own on this very very important subject of unemployment  We have unemployment in the rural areas and also in the urban areas. This is not the privilege of any particular district or area. It is common to all the areas of Meghalaya. We know that unemployment has come as a result of not only the educational advance but it has come as a result of other economic factors also which have tended to make poor poorer and the rich richer. Unfortunately with the circumstances appertaining today and the peculiar economic laws that are functioning, there has been greater cleavage between the poor and the rich. The rich get all the benefits of employment and all the opportunities of employment and the advantages of education lower, higher and university while the poor remained in their poverty and are doomed to annihilation. Now, in this matter the State Government has a very important role to play and I would like to submit that this role has not been fully or efficiently played by the Government despite their very nice promises and their nicely worded Budget Speech, which is nicely printed also. Despite all that, the sum total of many promises and assurances and proposals and considerations put forth by the Government, has resulted in no improvement of the situation.

        Now, Mr. Deputy Speaker Sir, I will first deal with the Government offices, where unemployment problem can be tackled. I do not know, of course, I am open to correction but I am convinced myself that this Single File System, if dropped, would give greater employment to many unemployed persons, whether they are to be absorbed from Assam or they are to be recruited afresh.

        I may humbly submit to the Members and the Government that at their level, at their Olympian heights, it is sometimes difficult for them to know the practical problems encouraged by L.D. Clerks and U.D. Clerks and even Superintendents in duty, murky and dingy offices. We have had, the privilege of meeting many of these underprivileged persons labouring like Hercules in ancient days. One man having to look after so many files, the result is that a great deal of Government work suffers from the file system which is almost like a traffic jam as files do not move. We have spoken over and over again on the congestion, not only the accommodation of Government offices, but even the congestion in moving files. Why is it so ? It is because one of two persons have to look after so many portfolios. This, I believe, is the complaint of the Government servants at the lower level and if this system now currently operating is dropped, then let us start afresh with the old system which gives satisfaction to the public and to the unemployed.

        As regards the Central Government offices, nothing much can be said from our side except to persuade this Government to persuade the Central Government to give adequate representation in employment to the local people. May I point our Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, that in almost all the Central Government offices in Shillong like the Income - Tax Office or the Post & Telegraphs Office or the Accountant General's Office, the percentage of tribal people employed is never higher than about 10 per cent.. Of course this is a very unfortunate legacy that has come down from the British days and pre-Meghalaya days. But certainly something must be done immediately at least to lodge a formal protest and then to follow it up with another protest  and then follow up at a higher Government level in Delhi to see that the instruction that 60 per cent of the local population be employed in Central Government offices, be implemented. It is difficult for an outsider coming into one of these Central Government offices to believe that this is an office within Meghalaya. It even looks like an office say in Calcutta. It is difficult to believe that these are the offices within the hill areas which have been created for the hill people to give employment, to the hill people in particular. So I urge upon this Government  to lodge a very strong protest with the authorities in Delhi to see that the Central Government offices in Shillong, Jowai and Tura and other parts of Meghalaya give adequate representation to the local hill tribal people. We have also before us the example of the nucleus of a new office of the North-Easter Council where we have been  trying our very best also, without power, to get the local people appointed. But also it is such a Himalayan task, more difficult, I think than climbing Mount Everest, to persuade some persons sitting in power to admit our people to the privileged office of the North Eastern Council. We are told that they need technical personnel, and in order to have Accountant, an Accountant must be qualified in Accountancy. Whereas from the Gazette of Meghalaya Government asking  for Accountants, the qualifications is only Pre-University. I am referring to the advertisement issued by the erstwhile Selection Board of Meghalaya. Now if the State Government can put the qualification of Pre-University with some basic knowledge of arithmetic plus hope and future training, a man will get admitted in accounts. The Central Government offices also may be persuaded by the Government of Meghalaya to accept the local people, though a man may not be a Chartered Accountant from London, but at least has the basic knowledge of arithmetic. Now still under the State Government there is another factor to be considered which makes some of us here sometimes doubt the bonafide of the Government, whether it really desires to solve the unemployment problem. I will give an example Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, of the Police Department. Under the Government of Assam in the Police Department, to be an Assistant Sub-Inspector, it was sufficient if one has passed Pre-University examination. But I suppose with a very noble objective of raising the standards of our people, the Government of Meghalaya has put down higher conditions for admission to the examination for Assistant Sub-Inspector and still higher for the admission to the Sub-Inspector posts. This acts as a bar. If we are going to ask a graduate to go to the Police Department with the fame that the Police Department enjoys and the background that lies behind that fame,  it is difficult to persuade the well-educated tribal young man to join the Police Force. He would prefer to go into Civil Service to sit in the examination under the Meghalaya Public Service Commission or to enter into any executive posts, but not in the Police Force. If the Government of Meghalaya could have persuaded to put some qualifications for admission to Assistant Sub-Inspector and Sub-Inspector, then we could persuade more young men from the hill tribes to enter the Police Force. I would strongly recommend the proposal made by the hon. Member from Jaiaw that we may think of having an office called the Meghalaya Regiment and we may also consider this proposal. I strongly propose to the Government of Meghalaya to issue a notification that they are prepared to raise three Armed Battalions, - the Pnar Battalion, the Khasi Battalion and the Garo Battalion, - 1,000 strong, so as to defend our boundaries at least.

Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :-  Where is the money ?

Prof. M.N. Majaw :-  If the Government is prepared to have such a Regiment, we are also prepared to help them even  to collect money. Now Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, there has been a complaint by the Khasi Hills District Council that the Government is not prepared to send the Police Force when they wanted to defend the boundaries. We do not want to have any unfortunate incident with the neighbouring States and besides large numbers of persons in the Police  Force in Meghalaya belong  to a particular community and they are to come into open conflict with the police of another State. So let them come into our fair fields, fair valleys and dales and take over the boundaries. Why, because we do not have a strong Police Force. We do not have sufficient men belonging to this hills who can defend these boundaries. So to solve the problem of the Government, I pity the Government, and to solve the unemployment, why don't we have three Armed Battalions - the Pnar Battalion, the Khasi Battalion and the Garo Battalion - 1000 strong - and start a Police Training Institute within Meghalaya.

        Now, coming to the points raised by the hon. Member from Jaiaw. I whole -heartedly support this idea of shop-keeping for young men and women, young ladies since ours is a State where the ladies hold the strings.

Mr. Deputy Speaker :-  Not all ladies.

(Laughter)

Prof. M.N. Majaw :-  Now, the Government does give loans to the people in the interior even in the towns. So we prepare to call this Government as a loan-giving or grant-giving Government which kisses both checks. it is our experience both in the interior and in towns that loans are easier to take than to repay. Now many loans are given in the interior to the persons for setting up of small cottage industries, even in the towns such loans are given. But I would humbly submit that in the cases of small cottage industries it is difficult to maintain a proper check after loan has been given because of shortage of staff and also because of the land tenure system prevalent in this area. It is sometimes difficult to maintain a very strong hold for the loan that has been given. On the other hand I fully agree with the suggestion given by the hon. Member from Jaiaw that through the banks through hypothetication of goods which will be for sale in the shops, there will be greater security for repayment of its loans. Initially the Government can give small loans for purchasing the necessary commodities to be sold in the shops and Government can set up some more restaurants or stalls not only in the places proposed by the hon. Member from Jaiaw. Why only in Police Bazar ? We can start in the present Sweepers' Lane of course  when they will be removed and after cleaning properly with D.D.T. and all. Shops can be set up and Government can let out there shops on rental basis to the young persons of the State and this rental basis will continue. In course of time initial expenditure of the Government will be realised from the goods to be sold in the shops. Then hypothetication control will be there and in fact the unemployment problem can be solved to some extent. But if we take up industries, as has been proposed by the Government, those old and stereotyped cottage industries, I think, it would not be of much help. It should be supplemented by other equally profitable or more profitable cottage industries and more relevant and pertinent to these hills. Now, we know that most of the economy of this area in business circles I mean  95 per cent is in the hands of some traders coming from other States particularly form two or three States. This business thrives because they have got business acumen, business contacts and they have the capital to invest. So I do not propose to suggest that the Government should offer huge loans to private industrialists to compete with these millionaires or multi-millionaires from outside the State. I suggest  that the Government should assist the local people who are controlling the raw materials which are absolutely necessary for these outsides trader and not to help them to earn more profits by exploiting the local people. Take for example a very simple example like broom. It has been estimated that huge proportion of brooms worth Rs. 3  crores or rupees goes out from the State of Meghalaya. We know these brooms grow in abundance all over the Khasi Hills District, although there is no programme for its cultivation under Agriculture. A colossal amount is being earned by these out side traders from these brooms and this money is going to their mother States to the great loss of the local growers to the State. On the other hand if the Agriculture Department can take up proper and organise schemes for growing of this broom in a specialised or localized areas unemployment problem of the rural growers can be solved to a great extent. Actually those who bind it , dry it and sell it to some private concerns of Bombay or Calcutta do not get the due benefit. So if the Government can draw up a proper scheme on this it will surely to some extent solve the problem in the rural areas. If the Government  could set up a Committee on this matter we could have contributed something from our poor and insignificant brain on this matter and we could have shown to the Government as to how much money could be brought out of this 'Jharu- apparently a filthy sweeping material to the economy of the State. Take for instance maize which is grown all over the State. What happens; this maize is dried in the houses of remote villages in huge quantity as seedlings or seeds for their next crops. Quite a big percentage of these maize seeds and seedlings are being brought to Shillong to be crushed or grinded for manufacturing food staff for the poultry farming. Then again the same staff come back to our poultries at a very high price. Instead I would suggest our Government to give some incentives to our rural people so that they may set up their small machine, which can be bought at Rs.200 or 300 for grinding and crushing maize seeds and our Veterinary and Animal Husbandry Department can also earn a small profit if they purchase from the local manufacturers. Like wise Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, we have got pine trees in abundance and we find truck -loads of pine woods going to Bihar for extraction of some essential oils and we have been hearing since last 3 years that our Government is proposing and proposing to set up some oil factory for extraction of oil from pine trees. But we do not know what they are doing. Now if we want cottage industries instead of huge industries which will take a long time to start, to conceive and to take birth and which will involve huge sums of money, certainly it would be better to take up small cottage industries even with these things. Pine extracts can be taken and then sold as essential oil to the other States of India. Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I would also suggest that the essential  oil from tezpata leaves, cinnamon and lemon grass which grow wildly in the Bhoi area Sir, this essential oil extraction which can be taken up with little assistance from the Government can develop into a huge capital industry which will involve crores and crores of rupees and that money can be invested for development of cottage industries so that the farmers, the rural people can be given employment in the interior and can utilise their time and earn some money. The problem in many parts of the interior is that most of the people take to cultivation a paddy, just one crop in a year. They plough their field to plant paddy and the while wanting for the harvest something they set sucking their  thumbs sometimes for months until the time of harvest. Another very important thing is to give ancillary occupation as an additional income to the people and perhaps Government should encourage  these small cottage industries which will also bring benefit to the people of Meghalaya. Let us not think of the big rosy dream of having huge industrial estates having a millionaire magnate from outside, for by that time our people will be in desperation. Now Mr. Speaker, Sir, before I call upon the Government  to take not of the grievances of the public in unemployment, I may remind the House that sometimes due to over work or perhaps it sometimes happens that we got up from bed on the wrong side or perhaps our coffee was burnt or our toast was burnt or something like that; that we become impatient and when the people came to look for employment, they were rebuffed. With due respect to everybody, sometimes it happens when people belonging to the Garo Hills, for example, the Garos Union, have had certain complaints for unemployment, they have been begging the Chief Minister to allow, them kindly and condescendingly to meet him, but alas they have not been allowed to meet the Chief Minister to talk about unemployment and that have one specific complaint in the matter of unemployment.

*Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :- Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I have had the occasion to meet them for a number of times and of course now they want another interview. I have told them that unless I can have all the points raised by them to be examined by the various departments, it will be useless meeting them unless the materials are prepared.

Prof. M.N. Majaw :-  One a fresh matter they have come Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, to bring before the Leader of the House. Well since they could not find any redress from the Ruling Party, they have come to us to express their grievances so that their matter can be taken up on a greater weightage. Now having pointed out that there is a great shift of responsibility where appointments are to be made after the expiry or the winding up of the Selection Board....

Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :- Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, for your information. This subject has been discussed in the current session during the general discussion of the budget and also on the debate on the Governor's Address. It was allowed by the Speaker, for a limited discussion only on two things.

        (1) Unemployment problem in the rural areas and (2) problem of unemployed educated youths. I think the hon. Member should, according to the ruling of the Speaker,  confine his observations only to these two points.

Prof. M.N. Majaw :-  Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I do not see any reason for interruption, but the unemployed youths are specifically those who complained that they have come for employment. They were the unemployed youths and not the old grand-fathers.....

Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :- Let us not talk about the individual cases but how to assess the problem of unemployment in the rural areas and the educated unemployed youths and that they should come forward with concrete suggestion as to how this problem can be tackled so that Government can consider......

Prof. M.N. Majaw :- One thing Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, we fail to understand why there is so much opposition form the Government. If the Government want to sincerely hear the cases of the unemployed youths, let them hear it, and if they do not want to hear then they show a true colour of their nature (laughter). There are genuine unemployed Garo youths and when they come to a person who is not a Garo also, they come to a person who has the same tribal blood flowing in this veins and since they have come to us, so we have brought this case of unemployed Garo educated youths and also the rural people. I do not think all of them belong only to Tura, but they have come from the outskirts of Tura and from the villages also. If the Leader of the House is willing to cut him see off from the District or from the people then it is a different matter. Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I may point out that there is a complaint that when they were told to get appointment, they cannot find a person who is to give them appointment whereby unemployment will be removed. They have a circular from the Head of the department who sends them to S.A.D. and then the S.A.D. sends them to Personnel Department then the Personnel Department sends them to Secretary and the Secretary sends them to the Chief Secretary and the Chief Secretary sends them to the Chief Minister and from the Minister down down down....

Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :-  Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir I would like the hon. Member to have a knowledge of a procedure, the procedure that be brought to the House is entirely wrong.

Prof. M.N. Majaw :- But this is their complain. I am happy to find that it is not so.

Mr. Deputy Speaker :-  Mr. Majaw I would request you to confine yourself only to two important points for which the motion has been allowed to be discussed.

Prof. M.N. Majaw :- I have been allowed to speak Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, on the unemployed youths who are on the verge of starvation. Of course the Ministers who are traveling in cars and living in luxurious houses perhaps it is not a question of life and death to them. At least my life is a very important matter to me, and the life of the unemployed is a very important matter. They have to remain unemployed and this is a matter of life and death to them. A very important matter, I am sure. Now Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, they want assurance from the Government and I will be happy if such an assurance comes. Whereby if a person is given employment, his unemployment is removed, which should be done soon. But sometimes it takes two months and then only to take him for two months-after all the paraphernalia and the rigmaroles have been gone through before the person is actually employed, and  even  this, is a temporary employment for 2 months after all the procedures have been gone into. We are very happy that after two years of complaint, two vacancies have been filled up in the Agriculture Department, Sir, there was a threat of retrenchment even, but the retrenchment is removed and for that we are grateful to the Government  for hearing to the requests of the Garo youths. So I support this well thought of motion by the hon. Member from Jaiaw which has pinpointed something on this very important discussion. I may add to the Minister in-charge of Transport that we may open many more transport  routes in order to give further employment to the unemployed, and I would readily recommend also for the State Transport further to be extended to the Bhoi area apart from the Gauhati-Shillong Road and that we may give employment to drivers, contractors who are unemployed in those areas.

*Shri S.N. Koch :-  Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, while participating in the motion brought by the hon. Member from Jaiaw, I will also like to bring certain suggestions as regards unemployment problem of our State. It needs to explanation to emphasize that this unemployment problem in our State is very explosive at this stage. The Government is taking steps to solve this problem, but it seems the steps are being taken very half-heartedly. There are so many factors and avenues which our Government is expected to take into account. We can solve this unemployment problem provided the Government is willing to go to that extent. If one travels from Dudnai to Tura, he will see heaps of ginger bags lying on the road side. During the time of the Assam Government the Agriculture Department made certain efforts to grow more ginger and as a result of which the poor cultivators adopted this method in a large scale and there was  large scale production. Unfortunately, it is seen from past experiences that there is no market for this product. The businessmen from outside do not purchase not do they want to purchase it. These poor agriculturists are ready to sell their products at the cheapest rate. So, I would like to request the Government to take certain steps for transporting this ginger or to establish certain Corporations which can purchase and transport it to places where there are markets otherwise the cultivation which is providing employment to our people or agriculturists of Garo Hills  to some extent will go out of their hands and the number of employed will increase. So far an organisation of the departments is concerned, it is also found that Government is always establishing the offices of the Departments only in  one place, that is, Shillong though there are certain such organisations or departments which can be set up or established in Garo Hills District where departments which can be set up or established in Garo Hills District where the people of Garo Hills can also serve in their own district. As far as the Board of School Education is concerned this can be established at Tura also so that the people of Garo Hills, mean the educated unemployed youths can also serve in that area, Shillong is fortunate to be the capital for the last 200 years and not only of one State, but so to say, of several States. It is the capital of a composite State and Meghalaya, and also it is the Headquarters of Arunachal, Manipur, etc. So what I would like to say is that whenever any department is opened and its offence located at Tura and if it does not  a hampered the work in this part of the State, it should be established  at Tura because the people there are facing great difficulty for getting employment. Only recently, I went to the Secretariat and there I had the privilege to see the consolidated list of candidates and also the willingness of the Garo candidates to join the service. Out of 400 or 500 candidates, the Garo candidates are hardly 50, and of that only 10 or 12 expressed their willingness to join. The main reason is that with such a small income of Rs.140/- it is not sufficient for them to stay at Shillong and serve here. So if Government from now on do not think over this matter of decentralizing establishment of departments, then the employment opportunity for the youths of Garo Hills is bleak. So I once again request  the Governments to establish some of the Government Offices  in Garo Hills otherwise the question of giving employment to the Garo youths, who are educated unemployed will not be solved. So also it is with the question of setting up of industries. If industries are set up in Garo Hills, this will also solve the problem of employment. In this connection, of course I have not seen any proposal and as the hon. Member who has spoken earlier also did not suggest, I had the privilege to travel with one Agronomist one day from Goalpara to Tura and I put to him a question- "Will you kindly look at the soil of Garo Hills and tell me whether tea can be grown in this soil of our District ? He has  kind enough to stop the vehicle and look at the soil. He said that if detailed survey can he carried out, tea industry is possible to set up there. So I would have been very glad if our Government could take steps to invite a specialist to explore the area and test the soil as to whether tea industry is possible to be set up in the Garo Hills district. Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, Garo Hills produces large quantity of bananas and pineapples, there is no encouragement from the Government to increase the production of these fruits in our district. So it would have been very much helpful in solving the problem of unemployment if Government comes with concrete proposal to help this banana and pineapple cultivation in the Garo Hills District. Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir,  regarding this unemployment problem, there are many many things to be said and argued either in favour or against and there are many suggestions to be made. I do believe that mere putting a number of suggestions will neither help the Government nor solve the issue which is under discussion. So I would like to confine to very limited schemes and one of them is for introduction of tea plantation in the District and another is for helping to increase the banana and pineapple cultivation in the District of Garo Hills which will definitely help to solve the problem of unemployment. Also Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, mere production of agricultural produces helps neither the agriculturists nor solve the unemployment problem nor improve our economic condition. Therefore, I would request the Government, through you, Sir, to see the installation of factories as now exist in Dainadubi. The Fruit Preservation Factory can be installed in other places for production of certain fruits. Another thing, Sir,  just near Garo Hills District we have a Paper Mill at Bongaigoan and recently I have come across the quotation called by this Paper Mill for the supply of bamboos. If the Government comes forward with certain helping hands I think we can help our educated unemployed youths by taking up bamboos supply as it is now being done. As the hon. Member has suggested, if the Government helps these unemployed educated youths financially they can be given suitable employment for the supply of bamboos to the Paper Mill because I have  come to know that the organisation will be purchasing annually not less than 10 lakhs metric tons of bamboos. Some of our young unemployed educated youths can take up this supply business. But as it known to all, we are economically poor and our people are not up to the mark or in a position to undertake the supply business unless Government comes in to help them with the required finance to start with. So Sir, I would request the Government to instruct the financial institution to that we can help the educated unemployed youths to take up such venture. With these few words I resume my seat.

Mr. Deputy Speaker :- Now the discussion is closed and the Chief Minister will reply.

Shri S.D.D. Nichols Roy (Minister, Industries) :-  Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, before the Chief Minister will give his reply there a few points which I would like to reply which deal with industries. Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, the Mover of the Motion has strongly criticised the delay in the implementation of the decision to take over the Meter Factory. Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, it is well known to the House and to the Members, particularly those who have participated, that the Meter Factory was closed by the Electricity Board. Now though the Government was considering reopening it, much work has to be done, to see how to re-open the factory and what would be manufactured and whether it would be successful. There is no point in employing hundreds of people to manufacture something and just leave them in the State unsold and that would not solve the problem at all. The Government gave the job of making a study, the technical study of the Meter Factory, to the National Industrial Development Corporation, a Government of India Corporation and that report was submitted. It was studied and then we started processing of finding how to implement the  suggestions made. One of the suggestions was that we should get the collaboration of the Indian Telephone Industries which would require a number of parts which can be manufactured in this Factory. The process of consultation therefore started with the people concerned, with the Indian Telephone Industry but the final result of that negotiation was that the Indian Telephone Industry was not interested in a joint sector collaboration but would only place orders with the factory. Certainly if the factory opens  since  the Government does not have any technical staff at all, it would require some collaboration with some party of group to provide technical staff for opening the factory. We have started negotiation with another party, a Private Manufacturer. They sent a man to investigate into the factory and I myself have gone to their head office and discussed with them in Bombay and their works at Jaipur and we are negotiating with this factory to have the collaboration for reopening this factory. Now it is not a simple thing to reopen the factory which has been closed down and to make it successful, yes, proper care should be taken  to hire technical hands  to open the Meter Factory, we should know how many meters should be produced and what is the cost of meter that can be sold. To make it successful is quite a different matter. Therefore, the members should have a little bit of patience with the Government before we plunge into a manufacturing industry so that it will work. There was another matter with regard to the suggestion made for employment of educated unemployed youths in providing them assistance to run taxis. There are certain limitations in this. That scheme has been adopted by our Government but only a few people can be employed in this scheme. The number of vehicles available per year is only 3 or 4. So there would be only a few people who can be employed in giving  taxis permits and they will be able to purchase one taxi per quota. That is the quota given to us by the Government of India. In addition to that, the mover has already hinted that it is doubtful whether many people will go into this with the change of the population pattern due to shifting of the Assam Capital. Whatever it is, it is one of the schemes for the educated unemployed and whatever assistance is in that scheme has already been accepted.. Regarding the remarks made by the hon. Member from Mawhati on the essential oil industry I am afraid that the Member from Mawhati on the essential oil industry I am afraid that the Member  may not be well informed of the nature of this industry. It is not an industry which need crores of rupees and of huge establishment to bring it in. As a matter of fact it is almost in the process of implementation; the Government have taken a decision. The scope of investment is of the order, of 20/30 lakhs of rupees, well within the scope of a medium-sized industry in our State and we are going  to distil and produce tej-pata oil, lemon grass oil, citrunella and ginger and essential oil out of whatever is available in our State. This will be done. So this is already in the process. The Company is in the process of formation and we require again technical assistance. It is not such a crude process that we can just do ourselves but in order to do it well, in order to make it a success, to requires some considerable technical assistance and for this we have been able to get the services of a very good party. We hope that this will be done within the course of this year. These are the three main points dealing with industries and how the industrial programme of the of the Government would help in the unemployment problem particularly of the educated youths. I would also like  to inform Mr. Koch that our Government are actively pursuing the question of setting of a Paper Mill in our State so that if this project does come in, it will enable a considerable number of our people in supplying their forest produce to the paper mill. But it takes time to process these. In fact, we have been discussing with the Government of India for quite some time and we hope that the process of examination will be completed soon. But it will require considerable co-operation with the District Councils of the three districts because most of the forest produce will not come from the Reserve Forests which are under the control of the State Government, but from the forest produce which comes under the control  of the District Councils Thank you.

Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :-  Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I am grateful to the hon. Member from Jaiaw for dealing with this very important matter of unemployment problem by initiating a discussion through a motion. The Government is fully aware of this problem and has had the occasion to inform the House, both in the Address of the Governor and also in  the Speech of the Finance Minister as to how the Government propose to tackle this problem. Government has decided to set up a suitable machinery with the State-Man-Power Officer for exploring further avenues of employment, arranging for proper training and ensuring follow-up action in regard to schemes for employment generation. The existing machinery of employment, the Directorate, will continue to function with such strengthening of employment as will be found necessary. This problem of unemployment as the hon. Members will agree with me, is not confined only to the State of Meghalaya. This is a problem of the entire country. The Government are fully aware of this problem and have drawn up a number of schemes for providing employment both to the educated unemployed and also for the rural people. We also have started implementing some of the schemes. For the information of the House, we have a special employment programme sanctioned by the Government of India. It was to be on the matching -contribution basis but due to limited resources at our disposal, we have requested the Government of India not to insist on the matching-contribution basis and for 1972-73 an amount of Rs.5 lakhs has been sanctioned. This amount was spent for construction of roads and bridges in the rural areas for providing employment to the rural population. We have also a crash programme for the rural employment and for the year 1972-73, the amount earmarked was Rs.37.50 lakhs. We expect a similar amount for the current year. A scheme for increasing employment opportunities for the educated unemployed has already been sent to the Government of India- for a crash programme - and the amount required for that purpose for a period of five years would be Rs.2,94,00,000

(A voice - Crash Programme ?)

Crash Programme. For the last year we sent a proposal for an outlay of Rs.9.13 lakhs but we have not received sanction from the Government India. For the current year, that means for 1973-74, we have sent a proposal for an outlay of Rs.46.98 lakhs. Since the proposal for the last year was not  sanctioned, it is proposed that the entire amount meant for the last year and the current year amounting to Rs.56.11 lakhs would be  spent during the current  year. We have also received communication from the Government of India that the Government of India is now taking up the scheme for providing employment under the Special Employment Scheme for the educated persons-to-provide employment to at least to 5 lakhs of the educated people of the country. We have also been asked to send proposals and we have drawn up schemes linked up with the crash programmes. They have been submitted to the Government of India for consideration and sanction. Well, Mr. Deputy Speaker Sir, I think the hon. Member will agree with me that this unemployment problem cannot be solved only by providing jobs under the Government, I entirely agree  with the mover of the motion that various alternative avenues of employment should be explored and the schemes drawn up so that the people can find employment. Various suggestions have been made as to how alternative avenues of employment could be created. The suggestions given by different hon. Members would be taken into consideration by the Government. Various schemes suggested  by the Government of India through the Planning Commission will also be examined by the Government as to what extent the schemes can be adopted and implemented in the State of Meghalaya. Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, since everyone of us is well seized of the problem of unemployment, I am confident that we will put our heads together and assist the special cell being set up by the Government in initiating the schemes for providing employment both to the educated unemployed and to the rural population. It will be possible for us to provide employment opportunities in future, but it will depend upon what extent our own people will be prepared to avail of these opportunities. I think there is a feeling at present among the people and they understand employment to mean absorption in the Government Service only and that is the reason perhaps why they generally talk of employment under the Government or getting job under the Government only. If that attitude continues, even though the Government has brought up a number of schemes either directly or indirectly for employment of both the educated unemployed and rural population, it may not be possible for us to produce any result. Now, referring to the crash programme, which we submitted to the Government of India, I would like to inform the House, through you, about the main features of the programme :-

AGRO CUSTOM SERVICE CENTRES

Object of  the Scheme :-   The Object of the scheme is to provide for establishment of 24 Service Centres  in the State with a view to popularising and extending improved methods of agriculture in the State. It is proposed to set up one Agro-Custom Service Centre in each Block. The scheme, apart from helping in creation of additional employment opportunities, will also result in improving agriculture in the State and would generate additional employment indirectly.

Main Features of the Scheme :-  The followings are the main features of the Scheme :-

        (1) The benefits of the scheme will be given to either one loanee or a group of loanees.

        (2) The loanees will be given the amount required for purchase of agricultural implements, machinery, etc,. on a subsidised basis.

        (3) The value of the equipments, machinery, etc,. will be subsidised to the extent of one-third. Each Service Centre will have the following agricultural machinery, etc. :

(i)

Tractors

...

...

...

...

...

...

1

(ii)

Power Tillers

...

...

...

...

...

...

3

(iii)

Drivers

...

...

...

...

...

...

4

(iv) 

Supervisor-Cum Mechanic

...

...

...

...

...

...

1

(v)

Helper

...

...

...

...

...

...

1

        The Service, Centres, apart from hiring the agricultural machinery on custom basis, will also serve the purpose of extending facilities for repair etc., of the equipments which the cultivators may be owning privately. Each loanee-group of loanees will be given as grant the working capital required for the first year of operation including the pay of drivers and staff, cost of Pol. etc. which has been worked out on lump-sum basis.

(No.2) - The  scheme is for the Cadastral Survey and preparation of land records. The survey is necessary for preparation of the records of right and for enabling the extension of agricultural credit facilities to the cultivators. Moreover, the survey and preparation of land records are necessary for undertaking any programme of land  reforms. In view of these considerations, the State Government proposes to undertake survey and settlement operations on a crash basis for a period of 5 years in the District of Khasi Hills, Jaintia Hills and Garo Hills Districts. The scheme provides employment as follows :-

40 Mandals in the scale of Rs.100 - 150 - per mensem

10 Traversers in the scale of Rs.150 - 300 - or Rs.140 - 225 , or Rs.125 - 200 - per mensem.

50 Tindals in the scale Rs.90 - 125 - per mensem

200 Khalasis in the scale of Rs.80 - 100 per mensem

Computers in the scale of Rs.140 - 225 or Rs.125 - 200 - per mensem.

Records -Keepers in the scale of Rs.125- 200 - per mensem

Store -Keepers in the scale of Rs.125- 200 - per mensem.

        The third  scheme is for setting up of a Training Centre for training of Survey and Land Records Staff. The scheme would require construction of a building and quarters for staff.

        Then the 4th Scheme is for creation of additional employment opportunities by strengthening the co-operative structure.

        The scheme will be operated with its object of giving managerial subsidy to the various levels of the co-operatives. The subsidy will be continued at the same rate for 5 years. The requirement for various types of personnel at various levels has been given as follows :-

(i)

Sub-area Marketing Societies

...

...

30 Secretaries

       

(Scales Rs.225 - 600)

(ii)

Service Co-operatives

...

...

150 Secretaries

       

(Rs.150 - 300)

(iii)

Co-operative Apex Bank Inspector-Cum Auditors

...

...

6

       

(Rs.225 - 600)

(iv)

Urban Co-operative Banks Assistants

...

...

(Scale Rs.150-300)

        The financial implication and employment generation are shown below :-

1972-73

1973-74

1974-75

1975-76

1976-77

Total

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

Employment Generation Additional Annually- Net (in Nos.).

 

(i).

Secy. for Sub-Area Cooperatives.

10

20

...

...

...

30

(ii)

Staff for Service Co-operatives.

10

100

40

...

...

150

(iii)

Inspectors/Auditors for Apex Bank

...

6

...

...

...

6

(iv) 

Asstts. for Urban Co-operative Banks

...

5

...

...

...

5

(v)

Other Staff.

...

10

20

...

...

30



Total Employment

20

141

60

...

...

221


Financial requirement :-

Subsidy (Rs. - .000)

1.

Sub- Area Co-operatives 

9

109

120

131

141

510

2.

Service Co-operatives 

7

276

370

385

400

1,438

3.

Apex Bank

...

22

24

26

29

101

4. 

Urban Co-operative Banks.

...

12

13

14

15

54

5.

Others

...

24

75

80

85

264

 

Total :

16

453

602

636

670

2367

 

Scheme V :  It has  been found that there  is acute shortage of Section Assistants for  working in P.W.D., P.H.E., Departments, etc. Expected requirement for these Section Assistants is 50 percent per year. The Scheme provides for setting up of a Training Centre for the Section Assistants. The trained  Section Assistants will be employed in the posts which will be created in P.W.D., P.H.E. etc. departments as a result of the implementation of the plans and schemes. The staff required for this setting up of as  training centre is as follows :-

Principal 1 (Scale of pay Rs.350-925 S.P.) per mensem.

Lecturer 1 (Scale of pay Rs.350-925) per  mensem.

Instructor 4 (Scale Rs.225 - 600) per mensem.

Office Staff 3  Grade IV staff - 10 Survey Boys - 10

        Besides some amount would be needed for stipends, etc., which as been calculated on a  lump-sum basis.

        The Financial implication of employment generations are shown below :-

1972-73

1973-74

1974-75

1975-76

1976-77

Total

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

Employment generation Additional Annually Net (in Nos)

1. Principal

1

...

...

...

...

...

2. Lecturer and Instructors.

...

5

...

...

...

5

3. Office Staff

1

5

...

...

...

6

4. Survey boys

...

20

...

...

...

20

5.  Grade IV Staff

3

7

...

...

...

10

6. Section Assistant Trainees.

...

50

50

50

50

200


Total - Employment

5

87

50

50

50

239


Financial Requirement (Rs. .000) :-

(i)

Pay and Allowances

...

86

93

101

107

391

(ii)

Stipends

...

36

36

36

36

144

(iii)

Equipments

50

105

10

10

10

185

(iv)

Building ..

...

180

365

...

...

545

(v)

Contingencies

5

10

5

5

5

30


Total

59

417

509

152

158

129


Scheme - IV :-   The purpose of the scheme is to establish commercial estates in urban and semi-urban areas  of t he State with a view to provide facilities for shops and residence to the beneficiaries of the scheme. It is proposed to build 100 units of shops and commercial residence at a total cost of Rs.50 lakhs or on an average of Rs.50,000 per shop. Initially, a working capital grant of Rupees five thousand and another grant of Rupees five thousand for furniture, equipments, etc. would be given. This would provide employment roughly to 200 persons as each establishment would have the employment potential for 2 persons. The shops will be given without any rent for the first year of the operation of the scheme. In subsequent years, a subsidised minimum total rental would be realised  from the beneficiaries for a period of four  years. As the scheme is being operated on a subsidised basis, it is not possible to make it up as a commercially viable  scheme or to finance it by loan from Life Insurance Company, etc. The shops will be built departmentally and hired out to the beneficiaries. The financial requirements and employment generations are shown below :-

(1)

1972-73

1973-74

1974-75

1975-76

1976-77

Total

Employment generation Annually Net (in Nos.)

Entrepreneurs/Salesman/Shop Assistant

...

20

50

60

70

200

 

Financial requirement (Rs. .000)

1. Constructing of Shops including land

...

500

1,280

1,50

1,750

5,000

2. Working capital grant

...

50

125

150

175

400

3. Grant for furniture etc.

...

50

125

150

175

400


Total

...

600

1,500

1,800

2,100

6,000


Scheme VII :-  It has been observed that the transport facilities in the State are extremely inadequate. The Commercial Transport operation are hesitant in extending the transport services to Meghalaya due to difficulties of terrain and hilly areas and the operation being uneconomical at present. The Scheme has the objective of extending financial assistance for the purpose of extension of transport facilities by the beneficiaries of the scheme. It is proposed to give assistance for the purpose of running of 50 taxis and 10 bus services. The main features of the scheme are the following -

1. The cost of vehicles will be subsidised up one-third

2. It is proposed to get the finances required for the purpose of the vehicles through the Nationalised Banks.

3. Each beneficiary will be given grant towards the working capital expenditure calculated on the basis of the salary of the driver, conductors as well as some lump-sum amount for the POL charges, etc. 

        The financial implications and employment generation are shown below :- 

(1)

1972-73

1973-74

1974-75

1975-76

1976-77

Total

Employment generation Additional Annually Net (in Nos.)

1. Drivers, Conductors and helpers

10

24

40

30

...

104

2. Self-employed as owners, co-operators, partners, etc.

6

13

21

20

...

60


Total - Employment

16 37 61 50

...

264


Scheme VIII :-  In the State Education Ministers' Conference, it has been decided in the national interest to introduce universal education to the children of the age group 11-14 by 1980-81 and in the age group of 6-11 by 1975-76. According to the census figures, the children population of the age group 11-14 is estimated at 70,000. As it is proposed to make education universal to this age group by 1980-81, the increase of the children of this age group had been taken at the rate of 22 percent. This would add 15,000 children to the figure stated above bringing the total number of children in the age group of 11-14 to 85,000 by 1980-81.

Estimate of Pupils :-  At present, approximately 18,000 children on this age group are attending classes in the M.E. schools forming only 26.4 percent of the total children population in the age group. If we are to make provision for all the children of this age group we shall have to make provision for about 67,000 additional children in 9 years in a phased manner. The target of additional pupils for next 5 years will be as follows :-

1972-1973

...

...

...

...

....

3.0 thousand

1973-1974

...

...

...

...

...

4.0 thousand

1974-1975

...

...

...

...

...

5.0 thousand

1975-1976

...

...

...

...

...

6.0 thousand

1976-1977

...

...

...

...

...

7.0 thousand

Requirement of teachers :-

        In a Middle English school, minimum number of teachers required is 5 including one additional teachers for teaching Hindi with a view to implementing the three language formula. Five teachers are considered necessary for a Middle English School of 100 students which is the maximum number that can be expected in a small school of three classes. Calculated on this basis, the minimum number of additional teachers required for M.E. School by 1980-81 with as view to implementing the decision at the national level work out to 3,350. The requirement of additional M.E. School teachers in the next five years will be as follows :-

 

1972-1973

150

 
 

1973-1974

200

 
 

1974-1975

250

 
 

1975-1976

300

 
 

1976-1977

350

 

 

Total

1,250

 
   
 

        The scheme provides for creation of the posts of M.E. School teachers in the light of the considerations stated above. The financial implications and employment generation are shown below :-

(1)

1972-73

1973-74

1974-75

1975-76

1976-77

Total

Employment generation Additional Annually Net (in Nos.)

...

....

...

...

...

Additional teachers for M.E. School.

150

200

250

300

350

1,250

Financial requirement (Rs.000)            

Pay & Allowances of Teachers.

1350

1,260

2,200

3,340

4,660

11,595

So, Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, these are the schemes under the special Crash Programme which we have submitted to the Government of India and it is under scrutiny. From this it will be clear to the hon. Members that the Government has been trying to find out a number of schemes which will provide employment to the educated unemployed youths in addition to provide jobs to the rural population. These are only the few schemes which the Government had taken up at present. I entirely agree with the hon. mover of this motion that there are other avenues for giving employment to the educated unemployed youths and for providing jobs to the rural population which have been suggested. But it is not possible for me at this stage to enumerate various schemes the Government is going to take up. There is a Cell in the State Bank of India and I am sure, the officers of the State Bank of India will continue to give proper attention to this problem and to find out a number of avenues. In consultation with the Members, I would examine the possibility, of having a small Committee consisting of the public representatives which will assist this particulars Cell in giving suggestion and advice as to what schemes can be taken up for providing employment to the educated unemployed young men, so that this problem will be gradually solved. Well, a few observations were made by the hon. Member from Mawhati which I consider not relevant at all to the problem. I had made it very clear that the Government is fully aware of the fact that at present most of the tribals within the State of Meghalaya have been suffering to the unemployment problem. It is fortunate that the Garos have  separate reservation in different categories of services. It is, therefore, not correct to say that the tribals of the State of Meghalaya have got no scope for employment. We have a reservation of 80 percent for the Garos, Khasis and Jaintias together, that is, 40 percent for the Khasis and the Jaintias and 40 percent for the Garos. But though the reservation is there, we cannot employ all the tribals, because we cannot just take anybody or everybody to fill up the posts. We have to go according to the procedure. Before the Public Service Commission was constituted, the selection was done at the State level by the Selection Board. It is unfortunate that even though there are a number of posts., the quota of reservation for the Garos could not be filled up because the Selection Board found some of the candidates not upto the mark. In this connection to tide over the crisis of requirement the Government have decided to reemploy or absorb the personnel from the Relief and Rehabilitation Department. Even then the reserved posts could not be filled up. The Government have also decided that the matter should be referred to the Public Service Commission to see whether the cases of those candidates belonging to the Garo community who have appeared in the Selection Board test could be reconsidered  to fill up those posts, even though they are below the standard of requirement, of an adhoc basis. It has been already decided that some of the vacant posts will be filled up by the Garos, if available on adhoc basis and small Committee is being constituted outside the Public Service Commission under the relevant provision of the Meghalaya Public Service Commission Regulation. So it will not be correct to say that the Government is not aware of these problems. It is very unfortunate that such utterances, which are misleading and which will distort the whole picture about the Government attitude have been made. I must make it clear Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, here, as a Government we must be guided by certain procedure in the matter of appointment, Simply because a particular community is not adequately represented in the Government Service, we cannot simply pick and choose. We have to follow certain procedure in the selection. We should have the proper forum for selection of the candidates whether it be from a particular Community or from the public. In the district level also, as I have already stated, we have got a District Selection Committee. As far as filling up of district posts is concerned, it has been decided by the Government to have a consolidated reservation. 80 per cent of the vacancies are reserved for the three main tribes, namely the Garos, the Khasis and the Jaintias. But as only a few Jaintias or the Khasi may be available in Garo Hills, the entire quota may be filled up by the Garos. Similarly in the Jaintia Hills District, 80 per cent of the vacancies will be reserved for the Khasis and the Jaintias together. So also in the Khasi Hills District. Naturally, in the Jaintia Hills District, since the Jaintias will form the majority the majority of the District , posts there will go the Jaintias. From this it will be clear that we are quite aware of the question of proper representation of the different tribes in the Government services. This is not, of course, very relevant to subject matter under discussion. But since one hon. Member has tried to give a distorted picture of the attitude of the Government in the matter of employment of the Garos I thought it would be proper for me to explain the situation. Now, with regard to the interpretation sought to be made by the hon. Member, I would like to say that I have had the occasion in the past to meet the Garo youths residing at Shillong and explain to them the position I received a memorandum submitted by them which concerned various departments. Naturally, my meeting them would have been of no use unless I can have all the points raised by them examined first by the departments. When I was furnished with the necessary information by the Departments, the Assembly session began. During the Assembly Session. we know that we are always very busy. Therefore, it will not be correct to say that I refused to grant interview.

        Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I quote appreciate the anxiety of the hon. Members to find proper and more avenues of employment both to educated unemployed and the rural population. I am sure that with the co-operation of the Members and with the various programmes being implemented, it will be possible to find more avenues of employment. A suggestion was made by the hon. Member from Mendipathar that some of the offices should be established in Garo Hills - instead of opening new office at Shillong. Unfortunately, the hon. Member is not present at the moment. here. I should say the Government cannot function, I am taking about the Directorate and the Secretariat, if the Government offices are located in different places. I have had the occasion to inform the House earlier that if the work justified, some of the Departments can be established in different places. I have had the occasion to inform the House earlier that if the work justified, some of the Department can be established in  different places. There is, for example, a demand that there should be a Directorate of Agriculture in Garo Hills. I should say here that there cannot be two Directorates but there can be an office of the Joint Director if the work justifies. Similar is the case with other Departments as well. We may have an office of fairly senior officer of the rank of Joint Director, if at all the work justifies. Therefore, we have got to be guided by the workload and the achievement of the particular department before we decide to establish such  offices.

        One suggestion was also made that we should raise a Meghalaya Regiment. The mover of the Motion initiated this suggestion and the hon. Member from Mawhati suggested that there should be three battalions of the Garos, Khasis and Jaintias. Here, I would like to request the hon. Members to consider the feasibility of this proposal - whether there is need for raising three Battalions of armed forces for Meghalaya. We should also consider whether we have got the finance even if we decide to raise three Battalions for the sake of employment. I may inform the hon. Members, through you, Sir, that last time when we approached the Minister for Planning for giving us some adhoc grant for filling up the revenue gap, he put the question as to how much we are spending for the Police. We asked or a grant of Rs. 2 crores. Then he asked what  was our own revenue.  At that time, it was Rs.1 crores 40 lakhs. On hearing this, he jumped and expressed surprise that we are spending Rs.2 crores on the police. I think I must make it very very clear that there may be need for strengthening the police force but there is no immediate need for raising this regiment comprising the Garos, Khasis and the Jaintias. Apart from this, we must be able to find and go for some schemes which will provide employment to the people and which, at the same time, could create durable assets to the State. I will be all our searching for such schemes which will provide employment to our people, both educated and uneducated. It should result in creating durable assets to the State.  Therefore, I would request, through you, Sir, the hon. Members, who have come forward with the suggestion to give a second thought to it and to find out some other schemes which will provide employment to our people and at the same time create durable assets to the State. Once again I thank the hon. Member who moved this Motion for giving us an opportunity to discuss about this problem and to gain some idea through discussions which could be further processed and this should not be the end of the discussion. We should have more and more opportunities to put our heads together to discuss this matter outside this forum also and I will examine the desirability of setting up of a small Committee to assist the Government through the proper department to draw up a number of schemes which will provide employment both to the educated unemployed and the rural population in addition to those schemes which have been taken in hand already.

Mr. Deputy Speaker :- Before we take up the next item, I would like to inform the hon. Members as regards fixation of the time limit. The Mover of the Motion will get 15 minutes and other hon. Members who will be participating in the discussion 10 minutes. So I would request the hon. Members to serve the time limit. May I request Mr. P.R.. Kyndiah to move Motion No.5 ?

Shri H. Hadem :- Before moving this Motion, may I rise a point of order, Sir, regarding this particular motion, admitted by your honour. As stated earlier in this Session that during the Session, Sir, this particular master has been dealt  with in the Governor's Address, in the Budget Speech during the general discussions on the Budget Speech, and during the Cut Motions. So I would like to point out that Sub-Rule (3) (vi) of Rule 131, while referring on the admissibility of the motion, says "I shall not revive the discussion on a matter which has been discussed in the same Session". Since, many Motion, Sir, are still pending to be moved, and, as stated, we have had sufficient discussions on  this particular subject, so I would request your ruling on this particular Motion.

Shri S.D.D. Nichols Roy (Minister, Industries) :- Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir, I would like to support the Member from Mynso-Raliang in this point of order. The information given in reply to the Governor's Address, in reply to the Budget Speech is going to be the same information will be given finally from the Government side. Plans for Shillong and so on and so forth are prepared and I think the point of order is very well taken and I would request that the Motion be dropped since it has already been discussed.

Shri P.R. Kyndiah :- Mr. Deputy Speaker, Sir,  may I say a word ? While I agree with the hon. Member that the matter was discussed in general about the planned development of Shillong, my Motion is specified in-as-much as I said under planned development of the capital town of Shillong particularly water scarcity, sanitation, etc. Sanitation was not discussed at all. Then market was not discussed and traffic was partially discussed. So this is not a matter which should not be discussed. Some of these have been discussed generally but not particular discussion as mentioned in my Motion. So I do not see that my Motion would overlap with the discussions that we were having previously. (Mr. Deputy Speaker, vacated the Chair for the Speaker) So Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg to submit that my motion is in order since it particularly relates to certain features of planed development of Shillong.

Mr. Speaker :- What does the Minister say ? I think the Minister has said that the same information will be given as already given in previous occasion and no new information will be given.

Shri E. Bareh (Minister, Agriculture) :- The Minister has just said that there will be no more information except the information that has already been given.

Mr. Speaker :- According to rules when a matter has been taken up for discussion in the House on some previous occasion, a Motion on that matter will be disallowed. So, I will disallow this Motion. So also Motion No.6 - Motion No.6 also falls under the same category. We have had occasions to discuss about the same problem. This Motion also is disallowed. We will come now to Motion No.7.

Shri H. Hadem :- With regard to Motion No.7 also , Mr. Speaker, Sir, the same rule is applicable.

Mr. Speaker :-  Yes No.7 also comes under the same rule. So No.7 is also disallowed. Motion No.8 has not been disallowed. So Prof. Warjri to move.

Prof. A., Warjri :-  Mr. Speaker, Sir, I would like to move that this Assembly do now take into consideration the question of introducing speed breakers at all strategical points in the streets of Shillong, so as to minimise the rate of motor accidents.

Mr. Speaker :- Motion is moved and now you can raise as general discussion on the subject.

Prof. A Warjri :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, as a representative of an urban Constituency, I feel and I believe my colleagues from the urban Constituencies feel the same with me about the importance of this question as far as safety of the people is concerned. In course of my visit to the different parts of my Constituency along with the Hon. Minister of State, in-charge of Public Works Departments in every locality, we came across representations of the people asking the Minister who was accompanied by the Executive Engineer, in-charge of Roads and Buildings Division, that speed breakers should be provided at certain points in their respective localities. Now, with the increase in the number of cars, there is also an increase in the number of car accidents. We were told by the authorities that speed breakers are not allowed and that speed breakers are against the law. But I also know fully well that it is against the law to run over pedestrians. Of these two, I think the latter law is bigger or rather greater and we should follow the one that is actually more desirable, that is, we should try to provide things in such a way, even if it is to the inconvenience of motorists, to provide certain things and certain safeguards for the safety of the pedestrian. On many occasions we have witnessed now a-days that people easily get excited while driving cars. Just a few days back, I think on Sundays there was an accident not very far  from this Assembly. Now as I have said, of course there is  a law against putting up speed breakers. But in spite of this law, even on the National High ways there are speed breakers. There are laws but always there are exceptions to laws. Even on the National High ways, although there are specific rules........

Mr. Speaker :-  May I know Prof. Warjri what do you mean by strategic points ?

Prof. A. Warjri :-  I will come to that. Now, what I mean is that speed breakers should be provided at dangerous strategic points all over the town for example in places where people cross the streets or children go to schools in order to avoid accidents. Because very often while coming or going these cars meet with  accidents is such places, in busy centres like Police Bazar. Even on the roads like Wahingdoh -Riatsamthiah road, although there traffic is not so heavy in the evening there is heavy traffic because people prefer to go to Welsh Mission Hospital by this way. Therefore I would request the Government through you Sir, that the speed breakers should be provided in these strategic places so as to avoid accidents.

Mr. Speaker :- So by strategic points you mean crowded places and especially where children go to schools. Because if you do explain the meaning it may mean the places of strategic importance. I think the matter is very simple and it is not open for discussion. I call upon the Minister to reply.

Shri G. A. Marak (Minister, of State P.W.D.) :-  In this regard a letter from the Assistant Inspector General of Police (Traffic) Assam stating that the speed breakers are being constructed without any legal basis. He has in this letter addressed to the D.C., U.K. & J. Hills District, (before the creation of Meghalaya State)  directing him to demolish the existing speed breakers and prevent new construction on public roads till Government decision in the matter is arrived at.

        The P.W.D. (R & B) Meghalaya also has like-wise written to the Inspector General of Police, Meghalaya, Shillong, to take up the matter with the Government in the Home Department to examine the validity of constructing speed breakers within outside Municipality areas and to take necessary measures to enact/regularise the construction by an enactment, if considered necessary.

        The decision of the Government is still being awaited.

Mr. Speaker :-  Which Government ?

Shri G. A. Marak (Minister, of State P.W.D.) :- Government of Meghalaya.

Mr. Speaker :-  You are the Government (Laughter). Your reply is from the P.W.D. point of view. But in fact no resolution of the Government should come forward without a full statement no matter this Department or that Department.

Shri G. A. Marak (Minister, of State P.W.D.) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I do not know what more I have to add.

Mr. Speaker :- The Chief Minister will have to clarify. It appears there is a tussle between the P.W.D. and the Home Department. There should not be a piece-meal reply.

Shri W.A. Sangma (Chief Minister) :-  The matter is under consideration of the Government (loud laughter)

Mr. Speaker :-  Discussion is closed. Now may I ask Prof. Warjri to move motion No. 9.

Prof. A. Warjri :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg to move that his Assembly do now take into consideration the question of prevention of deforestation in the State, so as to preserve the water source and improve the forest wealth of the State.

Shri S.D.D. Nichols Roy (Minister, Industries , etc) :-  On a point of order. The question of deforestation was raised by many Members during the debate on the Governor's Address and also on the Budget discussion and we have replied to some of the points about what Government can do or propose to do and try to get fresh legislation in consultation with the District Council. In view of this I do not see my point in re-discussing this matter.

Mr. Speaker :- Prof. A Warjri, have you got any other new points apart from what has already been discussed ?

Prof. A Warjri :- If the assurances given by the Government are taken up and implemented as early as possible, I withdraw the motion.

Mr. Speaker :- Both the Chief Minister and the Finance Minister in their reply to the debate on the Governor's Address and on the Budget have already informed the House that the Government was taking some stringent measures to stop wanton destruction of forests and have taken up some afforestation programme in a massive scale. So since there is no other business for today.

Prof. M. N. Majaw :-  There are resolutions also !

Mr. Speaker :- No, today only motions are to be discussed. The resolution will come up on day after tomorrow, of course, if time permits.   


ADJOURNMENT

        The House stands adjourned till 9 A.M. on Friday, the 6th April, 1973.

Dated Shillong

R.T. RYMBAI,

The 4th April, 1973

Secretary,

Meghalaya Legislative Assembly.

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