Proceedings of the First Session of the Provisional Meghalaya Legislative Assembly assembled under the provision of the Assam Reorganisation Meghalaya Act, 1969
*****

        The Assembly met at 10.00 hours on Tuesday, the 21st April, 1970 in the Meghalaya Assembly Chamber, Shillong.

PRESENT

        Prof. R.S. LYNGDOH, Speaker in the Chair, five Ministers and thirty two Members.


Report of the Business Advisory Committee

Mr. SPEAKER :- The first item in today's list of business is the announcement of the report of the Business Advisory Committee. I called a meeting of the Business Advisory Committee on 20th April, 1970 to settle the business for the current session of the Assembly. As this a very short session, the Committee approved the calendar a copy of which has already been circulated on the hon. Member and placed on their table. I hope this has the approval of the House.

(Voices - yes, yes)


Introduction of Government Bills

Mr. SPEAKER :- Now, the next item is the introduction of Prevention of Disqualification (Members of the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya) Bill, 1970. May I request the Chief Minister to move for introduction of the Bill?


Prevention of Disqualification (Member of the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya) Bill, 1970-introduction.

Capt. WILLIAMSON A. SANGMA (Chief Minister) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg leave to the House to introduce the Prevention of Disqualification (Members of the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya) Bill, 1970.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The motion is moved.

(After a pause)

        The question is that leave be granted to introduce the Prevention Disqualification (Members of the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya) Bill, 1970.

(After a pause)

        The motion is adopted. Leave is granted to introduce the Bill.

Capt. WILLIAMSON A. SANGMA (Chief Minister) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg to introduce the Prevention of  Disqualification (Members of the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya) Bill, 1970.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The motion moved is that the Prevention Disqualification (Members of the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya) Bill, 1970.

(After a pause)

        The motion is adopted. The Bill is introduced.


Contingency Fund of Meghalaya bill, 1970 - Introduction

Mr. SPEAKER :- Now, before I request the Hon'ble Finance Minister to introduce the Contingency Fund of Meghalaya Bill, 1970, may I be permitted to read the message of the Governor which runs as follows :

"ORDER

Camp Tura,

The 14th April, 1970.

        Under the provision of sub-section (1) of section 37 of the Assam Re-organisation (Meghalaya) Act, 1969, I, B.K. Nehru, Governor or Assam exercise my functions as Governor in relation to Meghalaya recommend the introduction of the Contingency Fund of Meghalaya Bill, 1970 in the Meghalaya Legislative Assembly.

B.K. NEHRU,

Governor of Assam.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Now, the Finance Minister will take leave of the House to introduce the Bill.

Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- I beg leave of the House to introduce the Contingency Fund of Meghalaya Bill, 1970.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The motion is moved.

(After a pause)

        The question is that leave be granted to introduce the Contingency Fund of Meghalaya Bill, 1970.

        The Motion is adopted. Leave is granted to introduce the Bill.

 Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Sir, I beg to introduce the Contingency Fund of Meghalaya Bill, 1970.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The motion moved and the Contingency Fund of Meghalaya Bill, 1970 be introduced.

(After a pause)

        The question is that the Contingency Fund of Meghalaya Bill, 1970 be introduced.

        The Motion is adopted. The Bill is introduced.


The Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker's Salaries and Allowances Bill, 1970-Introduction

Mr. SPEAKER :- Now, I take up item No.4. May I request the Hon'ble Finance Minister to take leave of the House to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

 Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg leave of the House to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The question is that leave be granted to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

(After a pause)

        The Motion is adopted. Leave is granted to introduce the Bill.

Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Sir, I beg to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

Mr. Speaker :- The motion moved is that the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970 be introduced.

(After a pause)

        The motion is adopted. The Bill is introduced.


Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya (Ministers' Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Now let take up item No.5. I would request the Finance Minister to take leave of the House to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Sir, I beg leave to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970. 

Mr. Speaker :- The question is that leave be granted to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970. 

(After a pause)

        The motion is adopted. Leave is granted to introduce the Bill.

Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Sir, I beg to introduce the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970. 

Mr. SPEAKER :- The motion moved is that the Legislative Assembly of the Meghalaya (Speaker and Deputy Speaker Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970 be introduce.

(After a pause)

        The Motion is adopted.


Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya (Members' Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970

Mr. SPEAKER :- Now let me take up item No.6. Well once again I request the Hon'ble Finance Minister to take leave of the House to introduce the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya (Members Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg leave of the House to introduce the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya (Members Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The Motion is moved. The question is that leave be granted to introduce the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya (Members Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970.

(After a pause)

        The Motion is adopted. Leave is granted to introduce the Bill.

Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Sir, I beg to introduce the Bill.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The question is that the Legislative Assembly of Meghalaya (Members Salaries and Allowances) Bill, 1970 be introduced.

(After a pause)

        The Motion is adopted. The Bill is introduced.


Notice for Amendments to Bills

Mr. SPEAKER :- As the consideration and passing of all the Bill introduced to day, will be taken up tomorrow, I request the hon. Member that if they have any amendments to make they should submit the amendment to the Secretary before 4.30 P.M. to-day either at my office or at the office of the Secretary.


Discussion on Governor's Address

Mr. SPEAKER :- The next item is the resumption of the Debate on the Governor's Address. As we have five more participants to take part in the Debate on the Governor's Address and as the Ministers will not get time to reply to many observations raised by the Hon. Members I allow 10 minutes for each of the hon. Members to speak. So the five more hon. Members who have given notice to participate in the Debate on the Governor's Address are -

1. Mr. Ohiwot Khonglah.
2. Mr. D.D. Pugh.
3. Mr. Akramozzaman.
4. Mr. Rokendro Dkhar.

        So, may I request Mr. Ohiwot Khonglah to speak.

Shri OHIWOT KHONGLAH :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, talking on the Governor's Address I feel that first of all I should thank the Governor for the various policy statement, aims and objectives his Government intends to achieve in development our new-born State of Meghalaya. I am very much attracted by the following statements being incorporated in the Address. "It is the earnest desire of my Government that with the creation of Meghalaya the tempo and pace of development in the State will be stepped up and every effort be made to ensure that the State catches up with the rest of the country as early as possible". Then again - "My Government intends to embark on a programme of development for the new State of Meghalaya. This programme will cover the development of Agriculture, improvement of means of communications, judicious exploitation of natural resources and improvement of employment opportunities. We would like to wean away the people from the destruction exploitation of available resources such as the practice of jhumming which destroys our forest wealth. We have to demonstrate the advantage of settled modes of cultivation which help to conserve forest wealth  and generally improve the face of the country side. Meghalaya is specially suitable for the development of animal husbandry, poultry farming, horticulture and fishing"........ "Meghalaya has abundant forest and minerals resources. This wealth should be tapped and industries based on forest and minerals raw materials should be set up. A diversified economy and optimum use of resources will help to raise the standard of leaving of the people. My Government will work for the creation of the necessary infrastructure so that industries are attracted to Meghalaya".

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, it is not my intention to talk much on the statement, but I would simply like to comment that if these policies, aims and objectives embodied in the address are really implemented in the true sense of the word, I have no doubt that our State will really be a model State and as the Sun rises in the Eastern Hills of ours, it shall also carry along with its rays the light of the Hills to the rest of the country. Mr. Speaker, Sir, looking at the Address as a whole I find that stress and emphasis has also been laid on development of those areas of the State which are more undeveloped and more backward. I feel that I should also thank the Governor for this that the policy of his Government is to give more weightage and special attention to the undeveloped  and backward areas of the different district in the State. it is not my intention. Mr. Speaker, Sir, to touch all these areas. But I would like to draw the attention of the House to a special references made in the Address regarding the people living in the border areas with East Pakistan. The People of the State specially those living in the southern border with East Pakistan have been adversely affected by the disappearance of traditional markets in East Pakistan. The State Government will have to examine measures for the economic rehabilitation of these people. We will have to take up with the Government of India the need for more centres of trade to be opened on the border". Mr. Speaker, Sir, I do not know much about those people in other districts, but I do know about those people living in our district,. i.e., Jaintia Hills. It is a matter of great regret that in the past, the previous Government had greatly neglected these areas. Some Partition the people living in those areas specially in the border of Jaintia Hills have migrated to East Pakistan and also to North Cachar District.

        To my knowledge,  Mr. Speaker, Sir, up till now the number of people who migrated to East Pakistan has come to about 18,000 and to Cachar district about 4 to 5 thousand. This migration is still going on and I am afraid unless the State Government comes to the rescue of the people a time will come when there will be no more people in this area. Mr. Speaker, Sir, this area especially in the border area, I mean in the West of the border of Jaintia Hills is very fertile for some crops. I am told Sir, that in some part to the Khasi Hills on this side-(the hon. Member pointed towards his right i.e. towards the East)-cultivation of coffee and other crops is very suitable and forest produce also are plenty in these area. To my knowledge there are extensive forest of different kinds from which different kinds of timbers could be produced which are of lasting qualities. Over and above this Mr. speaker, Sir, in these areas along the Myngot river, we can see orange groves, betel nut and pan leave etc. cultivation. There are also the main crops growing in these areas but Sir, the people there are facing great difficulties in transporting their produces because there is no road at the moment and I am sure that if a road is opened in that part of the Subdivision undoubtedly the people living in those areas will be greatly helped.

        Now, Sir, I want to refer to another statement in the Governor's Address which runs as follows : "Another step of immense benefit to Meghalaya be the extension of the railway line from Gauhati to Byrnihat which would facilitate the transport of materials and goods into and out of the centres of production in Meghalaya. The Shillong-Tura Road, the Damra-Baghmara Road and the Paiken-Tura road are very essential for the economic development of the new State." In this connection, Mr. Speaker, Sir, I would also like to suggest that steps should be taken up to open a road connecting Smit with Amlarem and meeting the Jowai-Dawki Road. Mr. Speaker, Sir, see one of the Ministers showing a sign as if he does not agree with me ............... (Laughter), but Sir, I am sure that if officers are deputed to go and survey these areas, they will see the benefit of opening this road. As I said earlier Mr. Speaker, Sir, along the Myngot river you will find orange groves and plantations of betel nut and pan leave which are the main crops of the border people, you will see extensive forest which as I said can supply timbers for years and years. Construction of the road is also feasible.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Your time is up.

Shri OHIWOT KHONGLAH :- Please give me some time more, Sir, as I would like to point out something more about the importance of this road. Mr. Speaker, Sir, construction of this road is quite feasible as I said because in the area there is already footpath which the people use in going to Padu village and which indicates that construction of a road is feasible. The road will pass along the Myngot river towards Amkoi village, on Nongbareh Khonglah villages up to Amlarem. I quite appreciate that most of the hon. Members of this House do not know where these villages is located but I am sure if officers are deputed to examine these places then everything will be in the know of the Government. Mr. Speaker, Sir, I can assure you that if this road is opened all those people who have migrated to East Pakistan and to Cachar district will come back to their heart and homes because by opening this road it will provide them opportunities for employment. And also these roads Mr. Speaker, Sir, in due course will help in opening up factories and industries and it will provide quite a good number of jobs to the people especially with the proposed opening up of railway station at Byrnihat. I for one take this road as an infrastructure in its relation with the opening of the railway station. I see in the 
Governor's Address Mr. Speaker, Sir, that there is an intention of the Government to open more centres for trade, for the border people on the border itself. But Mr. Speaker, Sir, how much this will really help the people. I think if we can focus our minds in opening markets in our country for these people so that they can transport their produce to other markets in our own country in India if would be a great help for them. Through the opening of this new road and with the opening of railway station at Byrnihat it will certainly help the people to transport their produce to Byrnihat and from Byrnihat to other parts of the country. So Mr. Speaker, Sir, I wish that this road be opened up very soon.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, I have also in mind to suggest other developments in other spheres in this areas. Take the case of agriculture. Mr. Speaker, Sir, I am sure that if a comprehensive survey is conducted in these areas the Government will be in a position to help the people there. Quite a number of crops quite a number of agricultural crops may be grown in these parts of the country. Mr. Speaker, Sir, as I said before there had never been any agricultural survey that side and the Govt. in the past had never been in the know of what kind of soil is prevailing in that area and therefore uptil now no help at all is given to these people. The people had to depend on betel nuts and jhum cultivation but Mr. Speaker, Sir, I am certain if a survey is made other kinds of agricultural crops can be provided for these people For industries also there is quite a possibility Mr. Speaker, Sir, that they can be established in these areas. There are signs Mr. Speaker, Sir, that iron ore is plenty in these areas. Our forefather had been extracting iron ore in these areas and transporting the same to East Pakistan and other parts of the country. So therefore, if a survey is in this connection also is made I am sure some help can be made for these people. But, Mr. Speaker, Sir, in this connection it will also help and I make an earnest appeal to the Government of Meghalaya to electrify these areas. Now in the Jowai Sub-Division Mr. Speaker, Sir, almost all villages in the upper side of the sub-division are being electrified but the areas in the border are completely neglected and to my knowledge there is no proposal at all. So, therefore, Mr. Speaker, Sir, if we really mean to help the people of the border of the Jowai sub-division and if we really mean to open industries, factories etc. in this area. electrification should be taken up immediately. Regarding education, Mr. Speaker, Sir, I would like to say that the people in this area in the Jowai Sub-division are very keen in education. They have been taking the trouble of starting schools in this area. They are very keen in sending their children to schools. Inspite of economic hardship they are sending their children to Shillong and other parts of the country for study. In their own villages also they are taking great interest in establishing schools, primary schools, M.E. Schools, High Schools. At the moment, Mr. Speaker, Sir, there is a High School at Sohkha which had been established about ten years ago, which was established in 1959. But then since 1959 uptil now no steps have been taken by the Government .................

Mr. SPEAKER :- I have given you double the time.

Shri OHIWOT KHONGLAH :- I am just finishing. Mr. Speaker, Sir, please bear with me. I would like to make an earnest appeal in the to the present Government to take immediate steps of provincialisation the Sohkha High School because I know that the school is facing great difficulties even in meeting the pay of the teachers and if you go and inspect the school, Mr. Speaker, Sir,  I am sure you will appreciate the services of the people rendered for the people. At the moment there is a Government M.E. School and because funds is no enough to appoint more teachers in the High School also without taking and understand the trouble, the sacrifice these people are doing and I therefore earnestly appeal to the present  Government to take immediate steps to provincialised this school so that the people and the teachers of the Government M.E. School will be relieved from this heavy burden. So with these few words, I resume my seat.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Before I allow the resumption of the Debate  in the House I would like to say that although I had given only ten minutes to participate yet I am not going to be strict with it. My only intention is to request the hon'ble Members to avoid repetition and to be more precise. It is better to avoid the practice of filibustering. (Laughter) Now, Singjan Sangma.

Shri SINGJAN SANGMA :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I take the opportunity to participate in the Governor's Address. It is known fact that the policy of the Government has been laid down through the address of the Governor basing on which, the Government will carry on various departmental activities in respect of shaping the destiny of the Meghalaya State. Sir, before I mention some points I want to express one very important thing before the House that one of the main purposes of setting up of this State of Meghalaya is to fulfill the political aspirations of the hills people and to fulfill their growing aspiration for that accelerated development and managed their own affairs through their elected representative.

        Sir, before and after the inception of this new State it came to be observed that there was a great expectations of the people in general and the tribal in particular that some new opportunities will be coming forth to them through living in the State of Meghalaya also can march in the way of enlightenment with the other advanced people of our country. Now I feel that it will be the duty of the Government to see and work to fulfill these expected desire of the people. Sir, we are very glad to know from the address of the Governor that equal opportunities shall given to all the people irrespective of caste creed religion and language. In this respect, may I know from the Leader of the House in what way equal opportunities are going to be given to all people whether in the way of democratic socialism or in other way?

        Sir, yesterday some of the honourable members spoke at length with special reference to certain important point and one with special reference to certain important points and one of our honourable members also spoke at length who described Shillong as the heart and brain, with special stress on the necessary schemes to be taken up by the Government for the improvement and development of Shillong, the capital city of Meghalaya. I agree with him that necessary  scheme should be taken up by the Government to improve and developed Shillong not only because Shillong is the headquarters of Meghalaya but also it is the headquarters of Assam, N.E.F.A. and the Army of Eastern Command, if I am not mistaken. Not only that but from the defence of the Country points of view also. In this respect, I feel that similar improvement and development of Tura the headquarters of Garo Hills and Jowai, the headquarters of Jaintia Hills is also absolutely necessary in order to give better facilities to the people living in this respective places and I appeal to the Government that necessary scheme may be taken up by the Government to improve and develop those headquarters. In the Government address mention has been made about the question of an Airport at Shillong with a view to making the capital city more easily assessable. In this particular matter, may I stress one thing that if the same question be taken up by the Government for opening of an Airport in the Garo Hills District near Tura I believe that it will not only give the opportunity to make Shillong, the headquarters of Meghalaya and Tura the headquarters of Garo Hills easily accessible but also it will give better facilities to make these headquarters more easily accessible to the rest of the country. So I hope that the Government will very kindly take up the matter with the Government of India.

        Sir, as regards the improvement and development of roads communication, the following roads have particularly been mentioned in the address of the Governor viz. The Shillong-Tura road, the Damra-Baghmara road and the Paikan-Tura road. I quote agree that these road should be improved not only to improve the economic development of the State as a whole. In this respect may I point out one thing that one most important road in our Garo Hills district i.e., Tura to Dalu via Garobadha, Amapti, Zigzak, Mohendraganj, Porakhassia and Sesengpara connecting Dalu-Baghmara at Dalu has been omitted. The improvement and development of the said road is inevitably necessary not only to improve the economic conditions of the people living in the border areas but also for the economic development of this new State itself. The length of the said road is about 64 miles which covers the western and southern part of Garo Hills. Mr. Speaker, Sir, the people living in these border areas have been suffering from various difficulties since the partition of the country and inspite of manifold activities done by the Government since the achievement of independence of our country, yet it has not been able to improve  their lots as it should be. So in order to give them better facilities in respect of improvement and development of their economic conditions I strongly feel that immediate action may be taken up by the Government to improve the said road.

        Sir, Agriculture is one of the most important factors in our human life and without its improvement, we cannot expect to march to the goal of prosperity and happiness. There are two types of agriculture in our Garo Hills, i.e. jhum cultivation and wet cultivation or permanent cultivation. So in this respect, may appeal to the Government is that suitable schemes are to be taken up by the Government to improve the agricultural activities in order to get more productions and there by to make the State self-sufficient. I believe this is the only way by which we can fight the aggression by hunger and starvation in the country. Now, Sir, let me come to the question of employment. The question of employment is difficult a problem not only in this State but also all over our country. In this respect, I appeal to the Government that in solving the employment problem equal opportunities are given to the component parts of Meghalaya whether he or she belongs to Khasi and Jaintia Hills and Garo Hills so that they will feel quite safe in protecting their interest. Sir, from the address of the Governor, it can be found that no mention has been made regarding the refugee problem. I do not know whether this particular problem is going to be taken up directly by the Central Government or through the State Government. So for my knowledge goes there are still quite a number of refugee families in our Garo Hills will be rehabilitated, and it seems the problem is increasing as because refugees are still flowing from East Pakistan. Sir, this problem is not a problem of the State alone but it is also a national problem. So I feel that necessary action may be taken by the Government to rehabilitate them and also to rehabilitate their economic conditions.

        Sir, one of our honourable Members spoke with special stress on the clean administration. I do agree with him and this is the thing what our people are expecting from this new Government. I feel that to make various scheme a success it depends upon the proper implementations and administration. So my appeal to the Government is that special stress should be given on the matters of implementation and administration so that the schemes taken up by the Government for the welfare and development of the people can be implemented in a successful way in order to achieve the goal we aimed at. With these few words, I resume my seat.

Shri D.D. PUGH :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, as I take the floor to participate in the debate on the motion now before the House, I would at a very outset describe the address of the Governor as being brief but lucid and I on my part Mr. Speaker, Sir, shall make an attempt to make my speech proportionately brief though I may not succeed in being as lucid. Coming to the Governor Address, I would say that despite its brevity the Governor has succeeded in stating the policy of his Government simply and lucidly and in doing so, it has naturally not been possible to spell out in minute details all that the Government plans to do in the service of the people. In the absence of these details I have considered it my duty, Mr. Speaker, Sir, to make certain observations on at least a few points; and this I do only by way of cautioning the Government, because I realise Mr. Speaker, Sir, that the Government is composing of human beings like myself, who in the hustle bustle of the day to day administration may over look the seemingly shall aspects of things. I would also Mr. Speaker, Sir, take this opportunity to express my gratitude to the Governor for the fact that while he and his Government were in the process of chalking out the policy for the State, they have not forgotten the District Council nor have they forgotten even the traditional institutions under the district Council such as the Syiems, the Dolois and Nokmas, etc. In fact, Mr. Speaker, Sir, I notice that from the point of view of paper space - in a 7 page Address almost all of 5/6th of a page dwells on these administrative units and institutions. To me, Sir, this is a clear indication that the Government intends  to improve and to make these institutions more effective instruments. In this connection, I would also like to make one observation and to say that however well-meaning the intentions of the  Government may be, no good purpose can really be served unless the Government is also determined to rectify these District Councils have exited for the last 18 years or so. I am now speaking of the policy of the State Government, especially in regard to the actual crediting of the shares of the District Council and the various grants from the State Government to the District Council fund. The point I am trying to make, Mr. Speaker, is this : Mere entrustment of more executive functions by the State Government to the District Councils will not serve the interest of the people unless it goes hand in hand with making the necessary funds available to the District Councils and to do that in time. If grants are made available to the District Councils for the various development schemes at the fag end of the financial year, it puts the District Councils in difficulty and also puts the people in difficulties.

    In the Governor's Address much has been said on the subject of Public Health. This shows that our Government is fully alive to the needs in this sphere of activities. In this respect I would only take this opportunity Mr. Speaker, to remind the House that the Government of India has decided to sanction 10 more Medical Colleges for the entire country. And therefore, I am to the opinion that we as a legislature and more especially the Government, should do everything in our power to impress upon the Government of India the absolute necessity to allot to this State of ours one of the ten Medical Colleges because, I believe without a medical college in this State, not much good can really be done in the field of public health. Therefore Mr. Speaker, Sir, I believe that steps should be taken on a war footing to convince the Government of India of our need.

        Sir, the other points which have been raised in the Governor's Address have been touched upon by other hon. Members who have spoken before me. I will, therefore, not waste the valuable time of the House on repeating the same observations on those points. Sir, I would however, crave the indulgence of drawing your attention to just one word and that is the word 'fishing' which finds place in the middle of page 4 of the Governor's Address. Concerning this word 'fishing' I believe that it has entered into the Governor's Address by mistake; I think it is the result of mis-printing. Whatever be the case, Mr. Speaker, Sir, I believe what has happened is providential because setting up or establishing or developing a fishery as such is not one and the same of making this State of Meghalaya where thousands of people men and women take interest in fishing, an anglers' haven. Sir, I believe if our Government can succeed in making the rivers and streams of Meghalaya a fishermen's paradise our State will have achieved a lot because, I believe, we cannot improve the facilities for fishing unless we can make our forests what they ought to be or unless we also change the age-old custom of destructive methods of cultivation or without providing the necessary means of communication. Therefore, I believe, Mr. Speaker, Sir, (Voices - Not Mr. Chairman but Mr. Speaker). I am sorry, I stand corrected. After all the hand of God was behind the entry of the word 'fishing' instead of the work fishery in the Governor's Address. With these few observations Sir, I take this opportunity of expressing my gratitude to the Governor for having delivered the Address which is now being discussed in the House.

Shri AKRAMOZZAMAN :- Mr. Speaker Sir, many of the hon. Member have spoken on the Address of the Governor and they have already touched the vital and important points on the matter which have been incorporated in the Address. Sir, I wish to speak something more. I am glad to find that in the Address of the Governor it is said that equal opportunities shall be given to all, irrespective of caste, class and creed. As the new-born State is named as Meghalaya and as the clouds do not discriminate to pour their showers equally to all, the Government of Meghalaya also will I believe, give equal opportunities to all classes and sections of the people living in the State. We are aware of one thing that our society is composed of different kings of people, and therefore there is a great difference between the poor and the rich. So the opportunities should be generous and it should be channelised in such a way so that the difference between the rich and the poor is minimized. I believe the Government is aware of the fact and I believe that in this way if we do not guide the destiny of our State, of our people these equal opportunities sometimes will bring some clash of interest among the people-if opportunities are not channelised in a socialistic way. So Government should attach much importance to these points. I now refer to some of the point on which the hon. Members have given opinion. One  important thing that strike my mind is the reference to Section 63 of the Assam Reorganisation (Meghalaya) Act, 1969. The thing is about Shillong. Shillong is an important place and it has an important part to play in the Hills and in he Eastern region of our country. Shillong is not only the headquarters of Meghalaya, but it is the headquarters of Assam and Eastern Command and it is also the headquarters of the NEFA. Shillong is not only important from the administration side, but also from the point to defence of the country. So the question of developing Shillong is very important. But in that section it is written that the Central Government may appoint a Committee to advise the Government the Government of Assam and the Government of Meghalaya about the development - so far it relates to Development. Sir, forming of a committees to advise Government is a different thing. I am very much perturbed to see that there is no assurance to finance to Meghalaya or Assam for the development of Shillong in this section of the Act. So I believe that in view of the strategic position of the State and the Defence and Administration of the whole Eastern Region the Central Government will take the problem as of national importance and development should be taken in such a way so that the whole Eastern Region is benefited and well developed. It is up to the Government of Assam and Meghalaya to take this problem in that light so that the question of development of Shillong there will be better relation between the Government of Assam and the Government of Meghalaya.

        Sir, in respect of Housing problem of Shillong, I feel that the problem of Shillong, I feel that the problem is not confined only to Shillong but to other district headquarters also like Tura. I believe the same condition prevails in Jowai also. Now about  water scarcity many hon. Member of the House who visited Tura last time saw that water was supplied by the fire-brigade. This is a problem which is not only faced by the people of Shillong but by the people of other district headquarters and also in the villages. When the question of development of Shillong is considered by the Government the question of  development of district and sub-divisional headquarters should also be taken up because they are the nucleus of development. I believe the headquarters. I put this matter before the Government for consideration and implementation accordingly.

        Sir, we have seen there is a reference to an integrated Hill Development Plan. But we have not heard what this integrated Hill Plan actually is, how much money has beer allotted; under what category of subjects like Agriculture, Irrigation and Health etc? It would have been better if the hon. Members of the House were supplied with copies of the integrated Hill Development Plan when Governor has referred to it in his Address, so that the hon. Member could give their comments on the Plan. I believe the Government it may be recast according to suitable or our development of the district. So far as Development of Agriculture is concerned, the question of control of jhumming and irrigation, there are some factor which are inter-related between the Government and the District Councils. The subject of controlling jhumming lies in the controlling the un-classed of State Forest which is under the control over land, adopted for the improvement of Agriculture here also the control over land i.e. land settlement and distribution is under the control of the District council. So in the sphere of controlling jhum as well as distribution of land, a good relationship should be developed between the Government and the District Councils. Because if this relation is not good. Whatever amount is spent the ultimate objectives as put forth in the Address shall not be achieved. Here one thing I really appreciate-that the Governor said about natural agreement between the District Councils and the Government. I mean mutual agreement in the sense that whatever is done under the new administration there should not be any scope of dual control of the Department and this dual control of the departments for many causes and reasons retards the progress of implementation of scheme.

        We know in this region, not only in this region but in the whole of India there is pressure on land and particularly in our region where there are no industries particularly 95 per cent of the people are dependent on agriculture and agriculture also is department on distribution of land. It has already been seen that "Land-Capitalism" has been started if not in the Khasi and Jaintia Hills, it has definitely started in the Garo Hills. So land distribution and land settlement should be enunciated and a Ceiling Act should be introduce so that the landless people may get land and so that there may not be any exploitation in the form of "Land-Capitalism" in this region. As I have said Sir, in its region where there are no industries big or small and since the economic life to the people is dependent on land, so land distribution and land allotment should get the basis of our development plans and scheme because if we cannot solve this problem I believe that all developmental activities or projects which might be put forward by the Government will come to nought. So I request the Government of Meghalaya to look into the matter and to take it up with the respective District Councils. The situation might be different in the Khasi and Jaintia Hills, but in Garo Hills this problem is acute and steps should be taken to tackle it effectively. I believe Sir, that if this land problem is effectively met we will be able also to solve to a great extent the unemployment problem in our State.

        Sir, here in the Address it has been mentioned so many developmental activities are to be taken up but most unfortunately one thing has not been mentioned because the Governor may not know or may not have the information that there is flood in Meghalaya and that this flood every year is a menace to agriculture but there is no mention about the matter of flood control to protect agriculture and agricultural production. Sir, in the Garo Hills specially in the Phulbari, Bhaitbari and Mahendraganj area, i.e., as many as 4 or 5 mouzar are affected by flood because of the back flow of water from the Brahmaputra which is coming back to the low lying areas and other places. From the month of June onwards to September/October there is always a crisis and calamities in these areas due to flood and I believe the Leader of the House is quite aware of this fact that the people of those regions suffered loss every year if not in crores but in lakhs of rupees due to flood. But unfortunately nothing has been done in this regard and no mention was made about this.

        Then again Sir, there is also one factor concerning the refugees. there are about 4 6o 5 thousand of refugees in the Garo Hills who have been settled in the low lying areas, i.e., in flood affected areas. For the better rehabilitation of these refugees, protection of land from floods is necessary because they also depend on agriculture. So the Government of Meghalaya must consider this factor. Sir, in the Garo Hills according to the 1961 census we have seen that the per capita income is only Rs.195/- the lowest in Assam indeed I should say, the lowest in the whole of India. If these problems of land and flood are not solved we will not be able to increase the per capita income of the people of this district. In this connection I would like to suggest. Sir, that in order to solve these problems the District Councils should be taken into confidence so that they can initiate plans and programme in consultation with the Government so that the money that should be spent in the regard should be spent to meet the real of our people. Sir, as you know in some portions of the Garo Hills especially in the Remotest Paris of the district in the border areas there is another factor affecting the lives of the people and in this connection I would like to inform you Sir, of one particular problem facing the people there. That is the question of cow lifting, yes cow lifting is going on and as a result cultivation is badly suffered. So if any one of us visit some of those villages in the border areas of Garo Hills he will find that cows and men are living in the same house, but even then this cow lifting is still going on ............. (a Voice - cow lifting also happens in the Khasi and Jaintia Hills border areas..........) So, Sir, unless this is checked effectively the economic condition of the people in those areas will be further deteriorating with the result that any amount which will be spent for the rehabilitation will be spent unnecessarily and the benefit will be spent for their rehabilitation will be spent unnecessarily and the benefit will not come to our people but it will have its way to the other side of the border that is to the Pakistanis. Therefore Sir, whatever plans and programmes are contemplating it should be seen that the national wealth does not go to the other side but the benefit should come to us and the people of Meghalaya.

        Then another factor Sir, with regard to marketing facilities for the people of Garo Hills. So far my knowledge and experience goes, unless the commodities produced in our border areas or elsewhere find their way to Dhubri and thereby to the West Bengal they will not fetch their real value. For this purpose there is an imperative need for improvement of communications and for that reason improvement of road from Dalu to Mahendraganj to connect these people with Dhubri subdivision is very essential. Again Sir, there was a demand of having a bridge over Zinziram river in between Phulbari and South Salmara. Now that bridge has been constructed near Nidanpur. So a road from Phulbari-Nidanpur via Moulokadi is essential to give way to products to reach markets in Dhubri sub division. So I request the Leader of the House to look into this matter who once took up the matter with the Government of Assam for the construction of bridge in between Phulbari and South Salmara. I know that a place which has been selected afterwards for this bridge on the plea to technical difficulties is far away from Phulbari and it will not help the people at all, unless a road from Phulbari to Nidanpur via Moulokadi is constructed to connect that bridge. Now Sir, if you go from Phulbari to Nidanpur the distance the distance at the moment is about 11 to 12 miles but if this road as suggested is constructed the distance will be reduce to only 6 or 7 miles. Sir, as I said that agricultural products from our border areas should reach markets in Dhubri and from there to West Bengal and so on and so forth. So this road is essential on the question also. I believe the Leader of the House is also aware of the fact that the road from Medhipara to Phulbari via Garobadha to Tura is the life line of Garo Hills at the moment. I do not know if that can be declared as a National Highway or a Trunk Road but it is a fact that if this road is not improved there is no possibility for any development to trade either for consumes or the produces in the district.

        Sir, I am glad to see that there is mention in the Governor's Address about extension of the railway line from Gauhati to Byrnihat. But I am sorry to note that there is no mention even of exploitation of railway facilities to Garo Hills. It is in 1945, if I remember aright in between 1942 and 1945 there had been some survey for construction of railway line to Garo Hills and I know that construction  of railway line to Garo Hills is possible-it can go up to Garobadha. So this railway line is constructed not only the mineral resources of Garo Hills but other things also can find their way to other parts of India. So this railway line is constructed not only the mineral resourced of Garo Hills but other things also can find their way to other parts of India. So I would request the Government of Meghalaya to take steps for exploitation of a railway line to Garo Hills also.

        Sir, I am glad also to see that there is mention about technical education Sir, technical education is a must now-days for scientific development every where. But one thing I must say that unless and until general education is improved the possibility of importance of technical education will be meaningless. Now, what are the educational facilities in our State? It is not at all satisfactory. So far as Garo Hills is concerned there are so many High Schools and Middle Schools but what is the condition of these schools and what is the standard and the mode of teaching? It is not up to the mark. the Government aid in some schools in only Rs.400/- and in some was Rs.500/- or so, as a result the teachers suffered. There is not classification of the schools at all. There is lack in the matter of proper utilisation of the services of Sub-Inspectors of Schools. In the field of primary education managed by the District Councils I believe the Leader of the House had experience of these things and I hope he will be able to manage the affairs in this regard so that general education from the lowest stage, i.e., from the Primary stage up to University stage be improved for the smooth running of educational institutions in general with better standard. I believe that in these things the co-operation of the people in general is necessary because I quite appreciate that it is not possible from the Government side alone to do this, so the cooperation from all sides is essential and so far as we from the Congress are concerned I can assure the Leader of the House that there will be no lack of co-operation whatsoever in all matters of development for the welfare and prosperity of the people of Meghalaya State.

JAI HIND

Shri ROKENDRO DKHAR :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, taking part in this debate on the Governor's address I would like to make only a few observations. Previous speakers have spoken enough that the programmes and activities as laid down in the address proposed to be taken up by the State Government but it will really be very difficult for the Government to tackle all these in a very short time. But Mr. Speaker, Sir, about mention here in the address about the trade centres in the Governor's address I share the views expressed by other members that it is doubtful if these trade centres will flourish because it seems that these trade centres in the border depends on the good mood of the Pakistani people and also Mr. Speaker Sir, which we always see and hear about are the clashes of the local people with the B.S.F. people any misunderstandings and clashes always happen and I would suggest. Mr. Speaker, Sir, that to bring fresh fruits to the other parts of the country that air life which was once tried just after independent, may be pursed again and also I agree with Mr. Swer about the opening of canning industry, Mr. Speaker Sir, it will be very helpful if we open preservation centres for the perishable product. Touching about the public health I would like to express that we are very happy to see that the Government will try to attract the doctors to go to the villages and also to provide equipment and staff necessary of these and at the same time I would like to suggest to the Government to reorganise the way the State Hospitals are working these days. Let us study and follow the way in which the mission hospitals and being run, for example the Khasi Hills Presbyterian Hospital and Nazareth Hospital at Laitumkhrah not only to give the best medicines and treatment to the patients who go there but at the same time to give the magic touch of the doctors and nurses to the patients. It will add 25 percent to the quick recovery of the patients. I would also like to speak on the subject education. In the resolution regarding Central University we will have enough scope for discussion but I would like to say only this much that the enough scope of discussion but I would like to say only this much that the present system of education in our country is like a factory producing graduate progressively every year and the graduates produced sometime have no purpose in life except to go for jobs in different offices. The system of education we have today is jobbery. So I would like the Government to examine this matter and try to bring a new system of education. Mr. Speaker, Sir, I will also go out of the way in suggesting to Government to argument the financial resources of the State. To my knowledge Mr. Speaker, Sir, the climatic conditions in these hills are very favourable for setting up of distilleries not only for consumption of the people in the State but a sources of income.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Whether distillery or distillery cum brewery. (Laughter)

Shri ROKENDRO DKHAR :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I do not know distillery or distillery cum brewery or winery but to tackle not only the waste but the illegal and unlawful use of rice in the present existing age old income to the State Government. I do not know if the fine tools and machineries that were in the meter factory at Polo ground are still there But. I would urge the Government to invite foreign companies for the manufactures of clocks and watches because and I have said the climatic conditions of these hills are very favourable and free from dust for producing good clocks and watches. Mr. Speaker Sir, with these few words I appeal to the members of the State Government and its officers and agents to work hard for the betterment of the people. It will be necessary not only to work hard but will also require and sincerity, the good will the love and understanding in dealing with the people in these areas. With these few words Mr. Speaker Sir, I resume my seat.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The Chief Minister has already indicated that he will reply in the afternoon but if the other Ministers are ready to give their reply I would invite them to clarify to the House some of the observation made by the hon'ble Members.

Shri E. BAREH, (Minister, P.W.D.) etc :- Mr. Speaker Sir, I stand from the Government side to give certain clarification regarding a few observation offered by the members of the House regarding my department. Mr. Speaker Sir, I should be frank to the House, that when these portfolios P.W.D., PHE. Town and Country Planning & P. were allotted to me I got the shock of my life. The moment the things was declared my Secretary said you have always criticised P.W.D. now you will be criticised. This Mr. Speaker Sir, in my humble way I was thinking that the P.W.D. whether right or wrong, has got a bad reputation from the public and it is my department's duty  and the duty of the Government to see that this bad reputation is wiped out from Meghalaya. I have told my offices to see that whatever work they undertake it should be honest-with honesty sincerity and so on. Mr. Speaker Sir, some of the members specially from my area-Jaintia Hills-wanted a road connecting Smit. I won't say it is not possible. We will try. How far it will succeed will depend upon the technical advice from our technical personnel. It is true, that portion of the border areas of the Jaintia Hills at the moment were left unchanged because no road communication comes from that area.

        Mr. Speaker Sir, the Member who raised the question is not here at the moment. For the information of the House, Sir, we have already a plan to connect those area with the rest of the District through I do not know whether it would be possible or not possible but we will definitely examine the matter. I cannot remember the name of the roads referred to by the Member in Garo Hills but as far as I know the road from Tura to Dalu is a existing road and black top road but however, I assure the member that we will certainly examine the scheme and will see whatever improvement can be done. But on the whole Mr. Speaker, Sir, I should say that my department is the most difficulty department because it is to deal with the development of the whole State.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Your Department will take nearly half of the budget of Meghalaya.

Shri E. BAREH, (Minister, P.W.D.) etc :- Thank you Mr. Speaker, Sir, in that respect I should be the fortunate man but as some one said "too much of everything is bad." So I hope as hon'ble Member from the other side has promised to extend all possible help the co-operation to solve all the problems of communication in the State I would also requesting the House to extend their helping hand, specially to this Department which has got, as I said, a bad name in the past so that we can erase its bad name completely and will get a good reputation in the future years. Thank you, Sir.

Shri SANFORD MARAK (Minister, Education) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I rise to give a clarification on certain observation, made by certain hon. Members of the House. One such observation is about the shortage of medical personnel in the districts. We all know that in most of the places in Garo Hills and also in Khasi and Jaintia Hills, the hospitals and dispensaries have been constructed. But all these dispensaries and hospitals are without doctors nurses, midwives and dhais. So all of us are quite aware of the imperative need of doctors and nurses in these areas. It is also difficult to attract the nurses, doctors and medical personnel to the interior parts of the district where there is lack of facilities and other allowances etc. Sir, in a place like NEFA and Nagaland, the Government has given all sorts of facilities to the doctors, what they call the non-practicing allowance and all that. So, in order to attract the doctors and other medical personnel to the State of Meghalaya, we are also examining the feasibility, if our finances permit, of giving some sort of allowances or other facilities so that they will be willing to come forward and work for us. Sir, on this, I would say that if we find it feasible we will go ahead to attract the doctors and nurses to the various hospitals and dispensaries in the State in order to make them fully equipped.

        Sir, there is another observation made by the hon. Members and that is about the sports and games. We all know that in the hill areas we do not have facilities enough compared with the plains districts. At the same time we also know the most o the hills people are sportsmen. But they wanted scope and other facilities to develop their skill. Sir, as Vice-President of the Tura Sports Association, I was very much connected with the sports activities and we have tried to give facilities. We have also tried to construct the stadium but for want to adequate fund the work had to be kept in abeyance Mr. Speaker, Sir, whatever we find it possible and practical in matters of improvement of physical side, we will try to do our best and we will have in examined and try to expedites it. Another point which was raised, Mr. Speaker, Sir, was about the Central University....................

Mr. SPEAKER :- I think we will have time to discuss that when the resolution will be placed before the House!

Shri SANDFORD MARAK (Minister, Education) :- Of course, Sir, another observation was in regard to the Medical College. Sir, we have as years many as 10 Medical Colleges which will be opened in course of the next few years time. I was told that after that no more Medical  Colleges will be allotted to any of the States. Sir, we are also examining whether we could get one of those ten Medical College allotted to our State so that we can go ahead with this programme are I hope in the near future it will be taken up with the Government of India.

        Now, Sir, the District Council's shares, we all know that all these three District Councils namely Garo Hills, Khasi Hills and Jaintia Hills District Councils have always got very meager funds at their disposal Sir, from my own experience I know that many of the Lower Primary School Teachers had to go without pay for months together as the funds could not the made available to the District Councils in time. But in future, we will see that funds are made available in good time so that the hardship of the teachers may, to some extent, be removed.

        Sir, I think I have replied to all the points raised by the Hon. Member in course of the debate. There is another things which was raised by certain hon. Members and that is about the High School at Sohkha. I think there is a proposal already to provincialised some of the hill districts. We will examine that proposal.

Mr. SPEAKER :- What do you mean by hill district?

Shri SANDFORD MARAK :- I mean Meghalaya, Sir, As I said we will examine and see what we can do. with these words, Sir, I resume my seat.

Shri BRINGTON BUHAI LYNGDOH (Minister, Finance) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, yesterday, hon. Member, Shri S.J. Duncan, raised a question on the present financial position of Meghalaya. Sir, I would like to draw the attention of the hon. Members to Clause (3) of the Third Schedule of the Assam Reorganisation (Meghalaya) Act 1969 which says as follows-"The total of the cash balances in all treasuries of the State of Assam and the balances of that State with the Reserved Bank of India of any other bank immediately before the appointed day shall be divided between the State of Assam and Meghalaya according to the population ratio." As on the appointed day, the Government of Assam had a debited balance with the Reserve Bank of India and for that reason the account of the Government of Meghalaya was debited with the minus of little more than 50 lakhs. But in any case as the accounts for March will be closed only for 27th April of this year, the exact position as the share of the balance on the appointed day will be known  only in the first week of May. In any case on this account we are definite that the State of Meghalaya is opening its account with a deficit of around Rs.50 lakhs. Therefore the Government of India had taken steps and had allotted to the Government of Meghalaya on the substantive portion of Article 275. For information of the House I may read out Article 275. There are two portions of Articles 275 of the Constitution. The first portion relates to all States and the Second relates only to the Hill district of Assam. The substantive portion which relates to all States in general is as follows :- 

275

Clause (1) Such names as Parliament may by law provide shall be charged on the Consolidated Fund of India in each year as grants-in-aid of the revenues of such States as Parliament may determined to be in need of assistance, the different sums may be fixed for different States :

        Now under this portion of the Article the Government of India had allotted 300 lakhs  to the Meghalaya State. As at present the Government of India has released to the Government of Meghalaya an amount of Rs.75 lakhs and so the present financial position of Meghalaya stands at a surplus of 24.97 lakhs. We are definite that this position is not adequate and so my Department had taken up with the Government of India  and the Government of India had by way of adhoc Ways and Means Advance given us a sum of Rs.100 lakhs over and above Rs.75 lakhs already released. There is another part which provides for Central Assistance for the Annual Plans and on that account Government of India had given Rs.20 lakhs for the year 1970-71. So, this is in brief the financial position of Meghalaya as it obtains today.

        Another Hon. Member Shri Rokendro Dkhar has suggested the desirability of looking into the question of starting a good distillery in our area. This question is under active consideration of the Government.

Shri STANLEY D.D. NICHOLS-ROY, (Minister, Agriculture etc) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, in reply to the various points raised by the Members in so far as the Department under my charge, are concerned I would like to first stage that as our Government has been installed only 18 or 19 days ago, obviously, as already remarked by some of the Members, it will be only a reply of intent rather than of what the Government has done. However, I would like to refer to a motto so far as my Department are concerned and perhaps the whole Government is concerned. We would be more interested in a motto of a school which i attend-It is in Latin and reads-"fact a non verba"-"deeds and not words." We would like to do many things and at this there is not much points in saying much. However, there are a number of interesting suggestions that have been made by the Members and we can refer to them because they have been mentioned in the Governors' Address and the policy statement of the Government in that Address. I would like to refer first to the question of air communication in the Governor Address a fact that the air-port for Shillong has been place with the Government of India as stated. As a matter of fact, Mr. Speaker, Sir, as public leaders, before this Government was installed, we had taken this matter up during the last two years or more and it is our intention to pursue this now as a full-fledged Government so that the air-port is established at the earliest opportunity. However, this House will realise that it is in the sphere of the Government of India, it is up to them to actually provide the finance and the airport needed. We are, however, taking this matter up very vigorously with the Ministry of aviation. A number of Members have mentioned this particularly Mr. Kyndiah. We are also glad to be informed by Mr. Singjan Sangma that Garo Hills also welcomes an Airport. I am sure after the Shillong Air port is installed, the Government of India may be in a position to examine other airports. But we are on our part, examining the feasibility to establishing an air-port in the Garo Hills near about Tura. However it is not easy to convince the Minister of Aviation which does not have the adequate finances to establish a number of airports that would like to have established all over the State. But it will have to be done in a fashion and according to the need of the area and the funds available. Now a number of  Members have been interested in the statement made by the Governor regarding the Railway line to Byrnihat. The question of extension of the Railway line as in the case of the airport has been taken up by us with the Government of India, at the initial stage as Public leaders and subsequently when the Prime Minister came to Shillong on the 2nd April, we mentioned again the need of the extension of the railway line into our State. We are also fully aware of the need of the extension of the railway to other areas and the fact that there had been an earliest proposal to have a railway line upto Garo Hills is also known but for certain reasons, the earlier proposal as mentioned by Mr. Akramozzaman has been dropped. Perhaps it may be revived. It will be the intention of the Government to re-examine the earlier proposal and see what the Government of India can do in this regard because in so far as the Railways are concerned it is strictly within the purview of the Government of India. Regarding the need of railway line in the various areas, the question will certainly be taken up by the State Government with the Government of India in the Ministry or Railway when the time comes.

        Now, coming to few of the topics under my charge, Mr. Speaker in so far as forests are concerned a number of Members have mentioned about deforestation, indiscriminate cutting of valuable trees and jhumming. All these are obvious problems and indeed they are some of the most difficult problem that this Government faces. Some Members have suggested-I think it was Mr. Singjan Sangma who suggested, that Government should take up improve methods of cultivation. He mentioned that in the Garo Hills there are two types of cultivation, wet or permanent cultivation and jhumming cultivation and he suggested that suitable schemes should be taken up on how to improve agriculture. Mr. Speaker, So far as jhumming is concerned it is a practical which is as most of the Members recognise a destructive methods of cultivation. It destroys the forest, causes soil erosion and it is something which should be eliminated if possible. But naturally before the cultivators give up the process of jhumming which means cutting of trees and burning them in order to use the land for cultivation of crops they will have to take up alternative methods of cultivation in those particular areas and that is what has already been laid down in the Governor's Address. Then one of the Members specially mentioned of deforestation and agriculture which our Government is going to tackle. Now, in the matter of afforestation some suggestion have also been made regarding preservation and protection of birds and animal and fishes. One Member has very pointedly mentioned about the need of making our streams and lakes a fishermen's paradise. Mr. Speaker, Sir, I wholeheartedly agree with that view, but then the question is how to do that? It is not only patrolling of the streams and lakhs to prevent indiscriminate killing of fishes by poisonous chemicals or gun powder or other blasting techniques, which I believe Mr. Bremly Lyngdoh suggested but it also means proper control of the environment. I can tell the House that this aspect has been receiving the consideration and attention of many countries-I would say far more advanced and developed countries than ours where streams and air are being polluted by products of civilization, products of human beings who have spoiled the streams by various ways in cities and towns, by natural waste or wastes that comes out of industrial plants etc. Before it is too late it is essential not only on the part of the Government but of every man in the street to recongise this tremendous danger of environmental control, of spoiling the environment both air pollution as well as water polluted as in the case in many parts of the world. Perhaps many streams in our own State may be so polluted so that fishes naturally die and we should not reach that stage. It will be the intention of the Government to try to prevent such contingency and I am sure all Members of this House would come along with suitable schemes and methods how to protect our streams and lakes from such pollution. We are endowed with many natural beauties with streams and lakes and we can easily make this State of ours not only a fishermen's paradise but also an attraction to attract tourist from other parts of India and from other parts of the world as tourist are attracted by the lakes of Kashmir and other parts of the world. It would be the intention of our Government to examine the various ways and means to bring about the desired effect. It is the intention of our Government not only to establish new fisheries in the State but also to maintain and improve the existing fisheries where they exist. Now coming back to the question of afforestation and abolishing the practice of jhuming, as has already been mentioned by one of the Members of the House, these matters come under the purview of the District Councils so also the question of indiscriminate cutting and feeling of trees. These matters will have to be taken up in co-operation and co-ordination with the District Councils so that there will be a planned process of reforestation and a planned and intelligent utilisation of our forest resources.

        In the field of industries, a number of members have suggested in broad terms the needs as has been broadly stated in the Governor's Address and having regard to the need of establishing various industries, I would like to refer to a suggestion made by one of the members Mr. Rokendro Dkhar when he stated the climatic suitability of Meghalaya for certain types of industries like watch making and so on. Mr. Speaker, Sir, as somebody having been connected with industry, I would like to inform the House that about two years ago I was examining as a private individual and public leader and industrialist, the possibility of some collaboration for watch making in our area and it will be my pleasant duty to pursue this and see whether we can have some sort of industrial development in this field and in other such fields where the climatic conditions make certain areas of our State suitable of such industries. The mineral based industries have been mentioned in the Governor's Address-I don't want to elaborate much on them. We have to Governor's Address-I don't want to elaborate much on them. We have to establish the survey of such minerals and we are already discussing this points in the departments which I am in charge of and we hope that within a short period of time, something can be done in so far as the survey as well as the preparation of the project reports of the industrial units based on minerals Meghalaya are concerned. Some members have mentioned about agro based industries, particular, the preservation of our horticultural products. This is something which is very close to my heart, Mr. Speaker, having been in this particular field myself. But it is unfortunate that the Meghalaya are of Assam-I should say-the previous Meghalaya area-the hills area and now our own State of Meghalaya has so far one of the most serious problem immediately which has been touched upon by one or two members who come from the border areas. The problem of this Citrus die back disease has been mentioned in the newspapers as well as in the Assam Assembly and has been discussed from time to time for the last 12 to 15 years. It will be our intention to tackle this very serious problem and to find our a solution to the disease which has killed many-many citrus trees of our north east India and we understand from the experts, a day may come when not a single orange will be found in the whole in the whole of north east India. It is a very serious problem and will have to be tackled not only by our own Government but by the Government of Assam, the other administrative units in north east India, with the help of the Government of India and even with the help of the agencies of the United Nations. I would like to inform the House, Mr. Speaker, that I had the privilege of meeting a representative of the United Nations a few day ago when he was visited Shillong and I posed this problem as one of the very serious problems of our State and he assured me that it the Government of India was to approve of any scheme such as getting technical experts from other parts of the world or sending some of our own people for training the United Nations Development Programme may be in a position to assist us.

        We have been warned, Mr. Speaker, by Mr. Ripple Kyndiah about the tendency in many parts of the world-perhaps of India of  becoming too materialistic when industries are being established and I am sure that it is a very pertinent warning to us. Because in an undeveloped part of a country of State, we need to take steps in planning industrialization to prevent some of the unfortunate results that other developed parts of the world have found after industrialisation such as improper handling of waste products. We do need to keep the human element and the joy and beauty of the hills of Meghalaya always in mind and particularly I would refer to this need when industries are established to keep in control the waste products of industry so that they do not pollute our atmospheres and our waters. 

        Now, in the sphere of agriculture some members, Mr. S.P. Swer and Mr. Akramozzaman in particular, have referred to the land problem. the problem of cultivators using land belonging to others. In other words, they are not cultivated their crops in their own lands and we are grateful to them for informing the House about this problem and it is a serious problem and it will be the intention of our Government to examine this and to take it up with the District Councils the need of improving the relationship, if that is the main problem, between the growers and land owners and the need of examining the question of land distribution.

        One of the members has raised the question of mechanization in the border areas. I think  it was Mr. Johndeng who had suggested that we take up in the border areas a certain amount of mechanization in the field of agriculture. Again this would require considerable investment in the machinery required for such mechanization required for such mechnisation. But it would be the intention of our Government to examine this. As a matter of fact, we were already discussing with our officers the possibility of such mechanization particular in the plains portion of the border areas because it would probably solve one of the very serious problems which has been pointed out buy Mr. Akramozzaman, the question a cattle lifting. It is a serious problem not only in the Garo  Hills but in the Khasi and Jaintia Hills as well as it has been brought to our attention repeatedly in the past years, the public leaders representation these areas could perhaps, it is a certain amount of mechnisation is introduced, the use a small power tillers and as such we may be able to replace to some extent the need of bullock and other cattle for ploughing. Certainly the need of establishing the security measures would also be a task or our Government but I will leave that part of it to the Chief Minister who will be finally replying in the afternoon. But I know personally, having been a representative of these areas, that there is considerable scope for improving agriculture particularly in certain areas of Khasi Hills if proper mechnisation is undertaken and in improving the yield by providing certain amount of mechanisation and also irrigation. The question of improving the yield of our crops in the border areas has also been mentioned by one or two members Mr. Swer has mentioned that even if we increases the trade centre in the border we need to improve our produce because the land is often not suitable for yielding much more than it is yielding today. Now the question of soil analysis is brought in and this has already been taken up by the previous Government. The Deputy Director of Land Survey had already been appointed and instruments and equipment had been ordered, and we are sure that such soil analysis and other technical requirements and the mechanisation of those areas would be getting attention of our Agriculture Department because it is only after proper soil analysis that we can know what fertilizer are required in different parts of the State and only then we will be able to provide the necessary things for improving the yield of the crops. The question of crop rotation was also mentioned by one or two members. This will also be given proper attention by the Agriculture Department. A number of  members have mentioned about the border markets, the border trade and some have gone so far as to say even if we open new trade centres it will not benefit the people. Mr. Speaker, as representing those areas I know a number of places which have already officially requested by the Government of India through the Deputy Commissioner of this district to open certain trade centres which had been established in the past and the only problem was that according to the policy of the Government of India those centres could not be opened unless a border outpost of the Border Security Force is near about. If such outposts are established by the security force of the Government of India like the Border Security Force and the trade centres are re-established this will enable the traders from across the border to come to our markets to buy the produce. But we do recognise that this is a question which depends on the goodwill of our neighbouring country East Pakistan. However, we cannot depend only on such trade. We will have to look into the matter of establishing alternative markets and again, as pointed out by many of the members, it depends on transport facilities. However air lifting is not a solution because the cost of air lifting is so high that it takes away all the benefit of the agriculturists, unless there is a tremendous amount which cannot be disposed of otherwise. Now one of the member Rokendro Dkhar has mentioned about air lifting just after partition in Shella. But in more recent years, I am sorry to inform the members. Mr. Speaker, Sir, those areas there was not enough fruit of air lifting because most of the trees died. However our Government will examine all methods of utilisation of produce grown in those areas apart from the trade that will go across the border and the establishment of small scale industries and the establishment of large economic unit for the utilisation of horticulture produce in the State. I may mention Mr. Speaker, that the previous Government in charge of the area had been in touch with one or two organisation and companies which  were prepared to establish a large scale canning and fruit preservation unit in our State and it will be the intention of our Government to pursue the yield of our fruit such as pineapple is very low compared to the yield in certain parts of the world and it will be the intention of our Government to help the growers of improve their yield which today I am told is about 4 tons per acre compared to about 25 to 30 tons per acre in the most advanced country like Hawaii. So all these things to give the improvement in yield-the fruit , the establishment of proper species and suitable varieties of fruits and vegetables and then the preservation of such horticulture products.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Your time is up.

Shri STANLEY D.D. NICHOLS-ROY, (Minister, Agriculture etc) :- Excuse me. I am ending in about 3 minutes.

        Now Mr. Speaker, Sir, many suggestion have been made by the members I would like to say that we shall examine very carefully in detail the specific that have been made by the different members and they will be given to the different department  so that any suggestions and recommendation made by the Members, will be given full consideration by our Government. I would like to say a final word on a matter which has been raised by two members Mr. Duncan and Mr. Singjan Sangma a world on the need for a clean administration. I am sure the whole House will be in full agreement with Mr. Duncan and Mr. Sangma who mentioned the importance of this aspect of the administration I would go further Mr. Speaker, to say that without clean administration without an incorruptible administration the plans and programmes of Government often come to naught. The money that is meant for development, for roads, or that is to help the agricultures often get diverted because of the people involves, because of the wrong implementation because of corruption and it will be the intention of our Government to see, to make all attempts with the co-operation of all he Members of the House and with the co-operation of all our people who have to have a clear administration so that we will honour the aspirating of our people because Mr. Speaker Sir, I believe that over and above everything else the yearning of our people for self-Government is also the yearning for a just Government the yearning for a Government which is run really for all the people of the State and not only for those who happened to be in the administration. That means we want all the people of the State to have a clean administration. The question is how do we achieve it. In our State we will try to do everything in addition to preventing corruption to see that the flaws of the administration are removed which as pointed out by one of the members, has become a thing of complacency in this country. We will make every effort as far as possible in the sphere of the whole Government to see that we do run a clean administration and we will try to check everything that will vitiate that objective. With these words Mr. Speaker, Sir, I conclude my intervention my remarks on the speech of all the members of my Department.

        Thank you.

The Assembly was then adjourned till 2 P.M.

(After Launch)

        The Assembly met at 14.00 hours with the Hon'ble Speaker in the Chair.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Hon. members as I told you in the morning session the Chief Minister will give his reply to the debate in the afternoon session I will, therefore, request the Chief Minister to take the floor.

Shri WILLIAMSON A. SANGMA (Chief Minister) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, through you I would like to thank the hon. Members who have been so good to participate in the debate on the Governor's Address. In course of the debate, various points have been raised by the various speakers and also valuable suggestions have been placed before the House. My colleagues have dealt with a number  of points raised by the hon. Members and also taken note of their suggestions in course of their intervention in the debate, and as such, I do not want to deal with those points which have already been dealt with my colleagues.

        Sir, hon. Member Shri Singjan Sangma had rightly pointed out to the House that the primary object of cheating Meghalaya was not only to meet the political aspirations of the people but to accelerate the tempo of development so that the people in these areas would fall in line with the rest of the country. I do not dispute that. I wish every one of us realise that fact and work for it. In fact, I am proud of our people who in their struggle for the achievement of our goal during the last one and a half decade conducted themselves in a peaceful and discipline way. I take this opportunity to thank them through you, Sir, to thank the thousands of volunteers who have worked hard in a disciplined and non-violence way with the support of the masses to achieve this goal. As you are well  aware, Sir, in this country of ours, whenever there is any move for achievement of social political and other aspirations, our fellow country men had to resort to violence which brought destruction, loss of  life, and also loss of property both of individuals and of the public. In our case, however, we must be proud that we have been able to set an example to the country and the whole world that without bloodshed, without losing any property and life, without resorting to violence the goal can be achieved. This is really a wonderful performance of our people. We, in the House, are indebted to our people and we must learn a lesson from them-to be patient to be disciplined and to be constructive in our approach to the various problems with our new State will face from now onwards.

        Sir, various speakers have made observation that the Address of the Governor is short and not comprehensive because we know the problems prevailing in Meghalaya are of a complex nature. The problem varies from place to place, from area to area, from district to district. So it is not possible in a short Address of the Governor to make a comprehensive assessment of the various problems and to lay out measures or programmes for their resolution and for removing of the various difficulties that our people are facing today. In fact, it is our considered opinion that it will be more desirable to know the problems of the various are as through this forum and from the honourable colleagues.

        Sir, as correctly pointed out by my friend Mr. Justman Swer, the Government of Meghalaya has been installed only on 2nd of April and we are only 19 days old. As such it is not been possible for the Government to make comprehensive study of the various problems of the entire State and that is why we have not tried to incorporate them in the Governor's Address. We felt that we would have failed in our duty if we did not want to be guided by the hon'ble Members in this respect. Therefore, it was our desire that only the broad approach to the various problems of the State should be indicated in the Governor's Address. Well, Sir, through you, I would make an appeal to the hon. Members of this august House to make a correct assessment of the various problems. It would be the primary duty of each and every hon. member to bring home to the floor of this House the various problems of their respective areas. But I would also make an appeal through you Sir, to take a broad view of the problem as a whole. In doing so it will be also necessary to classify the problems and the various difficulties and handicaps of the people. We must be able to lay down a policy as to which particular problem should be solved first. The solution of the problems cannot be automatic. The solution of one problem should help solution of the subsequent problems and for this purpose the various problems will have to be studied thoroughly by the hon. Members. We should not confine our study of the problems of certain particular area or a small pocket. Through this forum it should be our earnest and sincere efforts to know each and every problem of the entire state in order to enable us to solve the various problems more effectively. Sir, if the primary objective of bringing Meghalaya State for the people of this area has been understood by everyone, I am sure, we shall not fail in our duty, in our service to the people, and in that, I am sure we shall not be led by the narrow assessment of the problems and by selfish approach to the problems. The approach should not be confined to a particular pocket.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, Mr. Kyndiah wanted to know why there are no clear cut statement as to what system of administration is going to be adopted by this Government. He has made a reference as to whether this Government is trying to follow a single file system or fall in line with the present system of administration? Through you, Sir, I would like to inform the hon. Member and the House that this mater is engaging the attention of the Government. We have receive a report from the Administrative Reforms Committee in the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. This matter needs proper scrutiny, examination and serious consideration before Government comes to a final decision. It is not possible to indicate as to what system will be followed at this stage that is why it has not found a  place in the Governor's Address. While observing in this particular subject, Mr. Kyndiah has also warned the Government to go slow. It appears that he has taken for granted that we have decided a particular system of administration or set up. I would make it very clear that Government has not come to a definite decision regarding this matter.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, as I have said since the various points raised by the various speakers have seen already dealt with by my colleagues. I will give a general reply relating to certain policy matters. A question has been raised by various hon. Members regarding the relationship to be maintained between the Meghalaya Government and the District Councils. We have made a brief statement in the Governor's Address in this regard. Mr. Pugh also observed that it was not enough to entrust certain executive functions to the District Council without giving them adequate financial assistance. Through you Sir, I would like to inform Mr. Pugh that when the Government would take initiative to entrust certain executive functions to the District Councils on behalf of the Meghalaya Government, naturally funds would have to be placed at their disposal. We cannot simply asked the District Councils on behalf of the Government to do certain work without giving the necessary fund. This is logical. It will be of no use to simply ask the District Councils to discharge certain functions on behalf of the Government without providing necessary fund. We are fortunate in this House to have as our colleagues all the Chief Executive Members of the three District Councils. They will have ample opportunities to place their difficulties before this House beside making regular correspondence with the Government on various subjects as such, I am confident that the various difficulties and the handicaps of the District Councils can be placed before this House by them for consideration etc. and that the relationship between the Government and the District Councils will be very much improved in future. Some of the hon. Member have also expressed the need of preserving the traditional and customary rights of the Tribals and helping the District Councils to promote and improve the tribal democratic institutions under them. The District Councils have a number of such institutions. My Government will render every possible help to the District Councils to preserve and improve the traditional and customary institutions under their control. The District Council is their turn, should utilise these institutions for the service of our people. Infact one of the reasons for having our won State is to enable us to preserve and improve our traditional and customary institutions. I am of opinion that if it through effective in various fields. Mr. Speaker Sir, Sir, Mr. Justman Swer has also observed that apart from fund being placed at the disposal of the District Councils unless and until necessary personnels are also placed at their disposal it will not be possible for the District Councils to discharge the additional responsibilities which would be entrusted upon them. He even went to the extent to saying that it would be desirable on the part of the Meghalaya Government to consider whether the services of the State Government and the District Councils could be amalgamated. This matter deserves consideration. The Government will consider it. However this question needs joint discussion before coming to any final decision. If it is the desire of the District Councils to have common service it will receive proper consideration of the Government. I hope with the cooperation of the Chief Executives Members and our colleagues something positive can be done in this regard.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, our senior most and the most experience hon. Members, Mr. Duncan made a statement that our Government should have an efficient and clean administration. This question has been touched by my colleague Mr. Nichols Roy, I hope all the hon. Member of this House and every one in the country-and not only Meghalaya-would like to have a clean and  efficient administration. It is very easy to say that we should have a clean and efficient administration. In fact, I was once quoted by one press to have said "Capt. Sangma, assured to have a clean and efficient administration". I would make it very clear that such a statement never came out from my mouth. But I would like to have a clean and efficient administration. It is not a one-man job or it is not a job of the Chief Minister alone nor it is the job of the Government alone to bring about a clean and efficient administration. Unless we all are determined to be clean and efficient inspite of the desire of the Government, it will be only a wishful thinking. It cannot be implemented. It is not only the responsibility of the leaders alone to be clear efficient, honest and sincere; unless and until the entire society is determined to be clean and efficient, in spite of the best wishes of the Government and the leaders, it will be only a wishful thinking. Everybody should be determined to have such administration for the benefit of our people. Of course, I agree that in this regard the initiative should be taken by the Government and by the leader and this should not be confined to the Government machinery alone. The people of different professions should also be sincere and honest and must realise their obligations to the society. It is only then that a clean and efficient administration can come. Unless and until we are determined, I am sure, Mr. Speaker, Sir, it will not be possible to have a clean and efficient administration. Therefore Government must not think it desirable to make a statement in this regard in the Governor's Address because we find that it is very difficult task to have a clean and efficient administration. It is only with the co-operation of the hon. Members and with the co-operation of the masses and men of different profession that a clean and efficient administration could be brought about. Now let us take an example as to how this is difficult. As the Chief Executive Member of the District Council I had occasion to receive complaints about the performance of our Primary School Teachers. There are about 2500 primary school teachers in Garo Hills. They are supposed to be responsible persons because they are responsible for building up the society by giving education right from the start. Yet is was found that they do not hold classes regularly they hold classes sometimes only for a week in a month but they  would like to have their pay for the full month. They do not hesitate to claim their pay even when knew that they did not discharge their duties faithfully. In some cases classes are held only for an hour. We have tried to set up a machinery to correct this unwholesome practice but it was impossible. It is not possible to correct this kind of bad practice or rather I should this exploitation only through the inspecting agencies. In village where Primary schools have been established there is no dearth of responsible village leaders but unless and until the co-operate with us in tackling this problem, it is not possible only through the inspecting staff who used to visit the schools sometimes only once a month to correct this practice. I would therefore, Sir, through you like to request my colleagues to realise their responsibility of bringing in a clean and efficient administration because this does not lie with the Government alone. My hon'ble Colleague Mr. Bareh has stated that his Department has a bad reputation from the very beginning and I do not know how it would be possible for him to rectify this. As for example when a work is given to a contractor he is instructed to mix certain proportion of cement gravel and stand for a particular structure and although there are offices there, there are engineers yet he does not carry out the instruction honestly. What will you do? So unless and until there is a change of character in our society is it possible to talk about a clean and efficient administration? I would very much like to have it and I am sure every one would like to have it, but where lies the responsibility? The responsibility lies with you and me, with the mass people in the street. Sir it is a  fact that if one wants to get more than what is due to him it means corruption and exploitation. It is possible for the Government alone to rectify this? Therefore Mr. Speaker, Sir, this problem concerns the entire society. Unless the society itself wants to have a clean and efficient administration it will not be possible to bring about that type of administration simply by trying to remove certain officer or officers from the Government machinery. However, I can assure the House through you, Sir, that it is the earnest desire of the Government of my self and my colleagues that with the cooperation of the people at large to see that something is done in this regard.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, a number of Members have also mentioned about the border problems. The State of Meghalaya has a very long border with Pakistan; before partition of the country the villages in the border areas were very flourishing but for the partition these villages would have remained flourishing still. That was due to the fact that though we did not have road in those days before partition, we had other means of communications through our river routes and also  because our markets were located just on the border and it was easy for our people to sell their produces to the people of the border and it was easy for out people to sell their produces to the people of other side and to bring them other essential commodities which we do not have. But unfortunately although some scheme had been taken up by the previous Government for economic rehabilitation of our border people, not much could be done and as a result the condition of the people was further deteriorating. The Government of Meghalaya is aware of this fact and we are determined to take up programme for the economic rehabilitation of our people in the border areas. Some members have mentioned about opening up of trade centres or to resume trade with Pakistan. Mr. Zamman has mentioned that although the Government of India was willing to do this but there was no response from the other side. That is also my experience. A number of international markets were opened near the border in Garo Hills but there was no response from the other side. We cannot force the people of Pakistan to buy goods from us. In such circumstances it would be the primary duty of the Government of Meghalaya to take certain steps to have alternative markets of the various produces of the border people and also to bring those commodities that are needed by our people. As I said, Sir, my Government is aware  of these problem. Mr. Akramozzaman also made a mention about border security. He specially referred to cattle lifting in Garo Hills. As we all know cattle lifting is not confined to Garo Hills alone. This is also happening in Khasi Hills in the border of Pakistan. This problem has been frequently brought the notice of the authorities concerned and also the Government of Assam. I admit that it is also our responsibility to tackle this problem. But this a problem which can be tackled only with the active co-operation of the Border Security force. In fact even before the Government of Meghalaya came into being, as public leaders, we had taken up this matter with the concerned Government and also moved the authority concerned for more rapid patrolling along the border. But unfortunately this problem could not be solved uptil now. At this moment it is not possible for me  to indicate as to how this problem can be tackled. However, I can assure the hon. Member through you, Sir, that we are also very much alive to this problem and see what best can be done in this regard by taking up the matter with proper authorities.

        As the hon. Members are aware the Government of India have also decided to set up a North-Eastern Council for dealing with security problems apart from dealing with the co-ordinated development programme for the entire Eastern Region. Such matters as referred by Mr. Akramozzaman can also be taken up by the North Eastern Council when it is constituted and I hope some definite measures can be taken up at that time. The bill for setting up of the Council has already been introduced in the Parliament during the last Winter Session. The Bill is yet to be passed. I hope it will be passed during the current session and it will become an Act and the Council was soon be set up.

        The number of speakers have also observed that no mention has been made in the Governors Address of certain important roads. My friends Shri Sangma from Garo Hills has also complained that certain important road have not been mentioned of the particular road and express regret that it will not be possible for the Government to take up at a time the various road which are considered necessary. That is why the Government must decided as far as the road programme is concerned, to take up initially those roads which would help the State to develop Industry, Agriculture etc, and also the roads which are very vital from the administrative security points of view. I would therefore make an appeal through you, Sir, to the hon. Member to fall in line with the Government in this regard. It should be appreciated that unless and until we are in a position to create necessary infrastructure one of the primary objectives of our State to accelerate the development programme in the entire area and there by to raise the economic statue of the people will not be achieve. In the past it would be seen that every member wanted  and pressed for construction of some roads in their respective constituencies without any consideration whether such roads would create necessary infrastructure for development of industry, etc., or they were necessary from the administrative and security points of view. Unfortunately without taking this aspect into consideration they had pressed that some roads should be constructed within their respective areas and that during their terms of office of five years. This they had to do due to the pressure from the people whom they represented. It should, however, be appreciated that such an approach did not help creation of necessary infrastructure for all round development of the State as a whole. We have come here  to serve the people of the entire Meghalaya area. We can serve the people of the State only when we can tap all the resource available, such as minerals, forest and other resources. It will not be possible to tap those resources unless necessary infrastructure it there. Therefore, we must have a changed approach now. In the past, as I said earlier, because of the pressure of the member of the Assembly the Public Works Department had to take up the construction of a number of roads which did not help industrial and agriculture developments. In fact the Public Works Department should be primarily an agent to take up the various Programme for construction including road as are initiated by the different Departments of the Government, In order to create necessary infrastructure the various departments should be able to say as to which roads are essential for establishing various industries. The departments should also be able to indicate their power requirements. As far as our programme for roads and Powers is concerned priority should be given to those which are included in our coordinated programme. It should not be decided because somebody wants it. It is only through such an approach we can bring rapid economic development and through that serve our people.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, number of speakers have make certain observations regarding health services. While we talk about the public health programme it should be our duty to know our requirement for the entire Meghalaya area. We should be able to know how many public health centres and primary health centres will have to be established in the State. We should also be able to know our man-power requirement. It will be of no use, as in the past, due to pressure and demand from the public to take up a programme for establishment of a number of dispensaries and primary health centres without taking into consideration on as to whether we can provide them with doctors, pharmacists etc. According to that programme number of dispensaries building have been raised., In some of the buildings not to speak of doctors even a chowkidar is not there. I hope my colleagues will agree with me that it will be of no use to go for more dispensaries unless and until we are definite that along with the programme for such we are in a position to supply doctors, pharmacists, nurses midwives etc. I agree with Mr. Pugh and Mr. Zaman that we must take a training programme  to produce sufficient number of doctors, pharmacists, midwives etc. In our programme for health services we must also know our ultimate requirement because it will not be just for the Government to allow only certain section of the population of Meghalaya to have these facilities. The people in the entire area must get similar facilities.

        Mr. Singjan Sangma observed that everybody should have equal opportunity. He also wanted to know which particular ideology were pursuing? Whether Socialistic type of Society? Mr. Speaker, Sir, Shri Sangma belongs to the Congress. I think the present rift in the Congress is due to the fact that the congress. I think the present rift in the Congress id due to the fact that although they all talk about Socialistic pattern of Society but many people in the Congress do not work about it. It will therefore, been seen that though people talk loud of a particular ideology they do not generally work for the achievement of the same.

        I do not therefore at present claim to follow a particular ideology. However the Government fully realises the need for giving proper and special attention to the weaker section of the people. My colleague Mr. Justman Swer also said that the Government should attempt to reduce the differences between the richer and the poorer section of the people. I fully agree with him. However while trying to serve the weaker section of the society it will be the duty of the Government to give proper attention to other sections of the population also. With this end in view we laid emphasis for creation of necessary infrastructure. This will include producing adequate number of doctors, pharmacists, nurses and dhais as far as our programme in the public health is concerned. it will be our earnest attempt to man those public health centres which are going at present without doctors by giving them additional financial allowances so that they can be attracted to serve in the rural areas. My colleague, Minister for Health has already informed the house about this I would not repeat it. I cannot at this stage make definite statement as to what will be the additional financial allowances to the doctors.

        Mr. Singjan Sangma from Garo Hills has also mentioned about Tura-Dalu and Dalu-Sesengpara-Porakhasia-Mahendranganj Roads. I regret I forgot to reply regarding these road earlier. These roads have already been constructed and some improvement programme also is going on. In the Governor's Address mention only a few roads was ready which are very essential for agriculture and industrial developments. As such hon. Member should not please misunderstand that certain important road have been mentioned in the Address and as such those roads are being neglected. But in this connection I would like to say that it will be of no use to take up number of roads without completing a single one. we should therefore take up our road schemes in a phased programme.

        Mr. Kyndiah has also mentioned about the problem of employment. At this stage it will be difficult for me to give a clear-cut indication as to how this problem can be solved or being proposed to be solved by the Government. However our programmes for development should be such which will create employment potentiality; whether it is in the field of agriculture or in the field of industry, or in any other programme. This problem of employment is not confined to Meghalaya alone. This problem is prevalent all over the country. So we will have to tackle this problem along with other parts of the country. 

        Mr. Singjan Sangma has also mentioned about the refugee problem in my District. He complained that no mention was make about his in the Governor's Address. I know this problem. While I was the Chief Executive Members of the Garo Hills District Council I was dealing with this problem of refugees from East Pakistan. Though no mentioned has been made about this in the Governor's Address  it is our human obligation to see that these displaced persons have a proper place in our area. A programme for their rehabilitation has been taken up in Garo Hills and the same is continuing. I would like to inform the House through you, Sir, that this subject is listed under Entry 27 of the Concurrent List and as such it is not immediately under the purview of the Meghalaya State. However while discussing the Draft Bill on Meghalaya I have had the occasion to discuss regarding this particular subject with the representatives of the Government of India. At that time I also referred to number of other subjects in List III of the Seventh Schedule. In the course of my discussion I have been told that it is the Government of India and the Parliament  which enact laws in respect of most of the subjects in List III of the seventh Schedule. I have been however assured by the official of the Home Ministry that by necessary notification they will make the State of Meghalaya the executive agency for carrying out the provision of certain Central Act as may be deemed necessary. It is in this context we have not mentioned it in the Governor's Address. But thereby were are not shirking our responsibility towards these people in Meghalaya. Well, Mr. Speaker, Sir, since the various other points raised by the hon. Members have already been dealt with by my colleagues I do not propose to lengthen my speech any more. Before I conclude I shall make an appeal to the hon. Members, through you, Sir, to realise how this 9 days old Meghalaya Government is functioning with great handicap. We are, however, not discouraged by the various difficulties which were are facing at present. As the hon. members are aware were are still homeless in our own home as pointed out correctly by Mr. Swer I am staying in hotel and I am to function from there so also some of my colleagues. The hon. Members also have  not been able to get proper accommodation. However let us have patience. We are to start from the scratch. We have to build our State as pointed by the Governor, brick by brick, step by step. Except broad indication it is not possible for the Government to give a clear cut picture as to how we want to move in the service of the people. As I said at the beginning we would like to be educated by you in this regard. We would like to take your valuable advice so that we can plan properly. In fact the planning should come from the bottom. It must be focused through you to the Government so that we as leaders, we as representatives can sit together and can see what programme can be taken up for the development of the area and the people. I would therefore, Mr. Speaker, Sir, request the hon. Members to have more patience and also to realise that it is only through their valuable and active cooperation it will be possible for this Government to march forward in the service of the people. Let us all remember that we should not have been able to come to this House unless we had the roots in the masses. I derive my strength from the masses, you also derive strength from the masses. I will have to serve the masses. We have come here not to serve our interest but to serve the people. Once again, I would like to thank the participants in the debate the various points raised by them have been taken note of the valuable suggestions which they have placed before the House, will be given due consideration by the Government. Thank you.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The hon'ble Members know that the debate on the Governor's address is concluded. there remains the motion of thanks on Governor's Address moved by Mrs. Maysalin War, M.L.A. on the 14th of April, 1970 and seconded by Shri Grohonsing Marak M.L.A., I shall put the motion.

        "The question is that the Members of the Meghalaya Legislative Assembly assembled in this first Session are deeply grateful to the Governor for the Address which he has been pleased to deliver to this House today the 14th April, 1970."

(The motion was carried)

        Government Resolution Re : Setting up central University.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The Next item is Resolution for setting up of a Central University in the North Eastern Region of India. Will the Minister initiate the discussion?

Shri Sandford Marak, (Minister of Education) - Mr. Speaker, Sir, I would like to say that the Central Government have decided to go ahead with the Central University in the North Eastern Region of India. We know that the Assam Government have already passed a resolution enabling the Central Government to pass the necessary Bill. Mr. Speaker, Sir, until and unless we pass the resolution in this House asking the Central Government of Parliament to legislate the matter will be delayed.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Hon'ble Members I would like to remind that the Minister-in-charge of any Port-folio is to initiate the discussion to participate and to reply and to give chance to the Hon'ble Members to participate in the discussion on the proposal of higher education for the people of Meghalaya and would rather invite the Hon'ble Members to take active part in the discussion so that the Central Government will be able to see the keen interest that this Assembly is taking in this matter. Is there is no other Members.

Shri P. RIPPLE KYNDIAH :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I am very happy that you have allowed and given us the opportunity to participate in the discussion on this very important and vital matter concerning the Central University as indicated in the resolution. This matter is coming up today before the House and I believe this, will become up today before the House and I believe, this will become a historic event for the people of this part of the country. You know, Sir, this question of establishing Central University in the North-East India has attracted our attention not only today. In fact, this question has been agitating the minds of the people of these areas, for, if I am correct, more than 5 or 6 years now. I remember clearly, some year ago, at the instance of the Union Government and the U.G.C., a Committee had been formed in which the Hon'ble the Deputy Speaker of Lok Speaker, Mr. G.G. Swell, was associated. Since then matter has been agitating our minds, and in fact, a few months ago they had been a strong agitation of the people for the delay in establishing this University which had been a so long exercising their minds' Sir, it is indeed a happy occasion now that we are getting this privilege to discuss this matter with a view to paying the way for the ultimate establishing of the Central University.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, I think it is right on my part and I believe the hon. Members of this House will share with me in expressing our gratitude and thanks to the members of the Assam Legislature who had taken a decision earlier on similar lines to enable the Parliament to take a decision of establishing this University. I was myself at one time very much agitated for the delay in setting up this University. And fortunately for us, today as a result of the creation of the State of Meghalaya the way has been paved for the coming into being of this long-awaited Central University. Sir, this Committee which had also come to Shillong if I remember correctly, had visited this various important centres of the whole of the North-Eastern region of India. In the draft report of the Committee, if I remember aright, the question of location of the University was discussed. But I must confess, Mr. Speaker, Sir, that I am not aware of the University that is contemplated by this Resolution. I am aware, no doubt, that this matter has to be taken up by the Parliament. But at the same time, I think it is our duty to project our thinking on this very important and vital matter, viz., education, especially University education. I have noted with satisfaction today that is the deliberations of the House somehow or other at one state the word education crept in. Even in the last sentence of the speech of the Chief Minister, he has said that he would like himself to be educated. Therefore, it is really very very important that we approach the question of education is a very responsible and concrete manner. It is in that contest, Sir, that I am not craving the indulgence of this House to show or rather to think aloud about the matter. Sir, I have not come to certain concretization of ideas or thoughts. It is just that I am thinking aloud.

        Now, from the various speeches that we have had there is also another thing which come over and over again and that is unemployment. Now this University which is going to be established in this region, I believe will have to take into full consideration the various factors involved and the conditions prevailing especially in this part of the country.. Sir, somehow my ideas of a Central University is associated with the Hill University-I cannot divorce this idea of the Hill University from the Central University. Somehow, I have a feeling that this Central University is meant to meet the requirements of our young boys and young girls who will be the future leaders of the country. Therefore, taking into consideration the sum and substance of the deliberation of this House and taking into consideration of what I have said, I am inclined to believe, Sir, that we should project an idea that this University should not be an ordinary University producing mental weakling or autonomous who will be looking for once jobs. We have to project an idea of a University which will not only be the centre or the temple of learning. It should be a centre which will produce the citizens who are ready to grapple with the problems facing the country. Sir, my own feeling is that we have to consider the type of education. I myself being a product o the Gauhati University and I think you also Sir, are a product of the Gauhati University and some of us here are products of Calcutta University and now another University has come up, the Dibrugarh University and we have had our own experience in these Universities. Therefore, I feel that for the Hill people the University should be technology bias with a view to produce technicians. Sir, I have had experience in this particular study and I find most of our young boys are very adept with their hands but because of the lack of scope for training they have not been able to come up to expectations. For instance, Sir, we have the human potentiality but we do not have opportunity to produce them to be good mechanical hands. That is one side of the question. I do not want to dilate too much on the quality of the people of the people of the hill areas. I have always taken a view that whatever developed we want to undertake, it should have an agriculture base think that is also the idea which is embodied in the Five Plan itself. But in so far as our areas are concerned, I wish that development of agriculture is a very important, vital and a basis matter, should get priority. It is my own experience, while going into the interior to have seen the agricultural graduates sitting in an office writing on papers with pen. I saw also a farmer cultivating and ploughing his land. When I talk to the agricultural graduate I am struck by his theoretical knowledge. But when I talked to him about the practical aspect of agriculture he is indifferently....................

Mr. SPEAKER :- I think I will have to guide the House in certain matters. We are discussing here on the resolution recommended by the Central Government to set up a Central University and we are not  discussion the educational policy of the Government of Meghalaya. That is why, in my opinion, it would be for the Hon. Members of the House to express their opinion on what would be the administrative set up of that University. Whether the Meghalaya Government will be given hands in that Central University; whether it should be a residential University or a mere affiliating University. These are the considerations that we should really take up. I think I can not really encourage the Hon. Members to discuss the educational policy of this juncture, as in the last analysis it will have to go through the whole process right from the primary stage indulgence to project  our thoughts which may not be strictly relevant, Sir, I am a disciplined Member and I will abide by your guidance. Now speaking on the University as to whether it would be a residential or non residential or an urban or rural University, my own opinion on this is that the University should not be isolated from the people. It should be just enough to get the experience of the rural atmosphere and the rural life, but as the some time not very far away from the city. That is so far about the location of the University. As to the second aspect I would certainly go for a residential type of University. Why I say so, it is because of my realisation that education that will be imparted to the students should not be on a fractional basis, half at home and half a University. We have to remember that we are to educate the students as a whole and not as a fraction. Therefore, I feel the residential type of University will be able to afford more opportunity the students to get in touch with the various facilities provided by the University. It is in that context that I would prefer to have a residential University. I do not know about organisation of the Central University, But I would certainly feel that it is right and proper that this Government or this House, whatever the case may be, should be fully associated in the management of the University because without that it will be almost impossible fro the management to guide the courses of the University. Therefore, I feel that it is important rather an absolute necessity for the Government of to be associated fully in the management of the University. I do not know Meghalaya Sir, whether you will like me to just dilate on a few points which.........

Mr. SPEAKER :- Yes, it is relevant.

Shri P. RIPPLE KYNDIAH :- Well, Sir, somehow I do know we should be clear about the aim of education, what it is? But as I said sometime ago that education should not be like a reservoir where whether is stored and from time to time it is taken out and ultimately get exhausted. I think the aim of education is to make a man like a fountain having perennial supply of ideas and it is not so much of what we teach but how we teach. I think education whether it technical or non-technical is the ultimate analysis the society will judge university on the quality of the persons educated by it. Therefore, I feel Sir, that the University should strive for that kind of education which is technical and at the same time not losing sight of the human aspects. Now, I am coming to what you have told me not to dilate, but I feel that we should try to approach this question from time to time with new ideas. it may be possible for the hon. Chief Minister and Ministers to take note o this so that they can take up with the Government of India. As I said at the very beginning this Resolution for the Resolution for the establishment of the Central University has come at a very opportune time. It has agitated the minds of the people and how when this Resolution has come in it is almost certain that the establishment of the University will be taken up by the Parliament. So I support the motion on this Resolution.

        With these words, Sir, I resume my seat.

Shri S.J. DUNCAN :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, judging by the text of the Resolution I quite agree with you that all we have to do now is to pass this Resolution to enable the Central Government to establish this University in Meghalaya. The reason that has been given is : Education being a State subject the Central Government could not establish the University in a State without the consent or atleast two States. As has been pointed out before, this Central University should have been established much earlier and we were not able to obtain the consent of another State. However, now that Meghalaya is a State it is in a position to fill that gap and we are all happy.

        Mr. Speaker, Sir, I will keep within the guide lines given by you and confine myself to one or two points only. Firstly, whether Meghalaya Government should have any hand at all in the control or management of the University? I feel that the object of the University being more or less to encourage tribal culture particularly and to improve the quality of education in general, our Government should have a big say in the matter, particularly in the sphere of appointment of the staff. That is very important. Mr. Speaker in my opinion, because being a Central University we may be flooded with people from outside with no interest whatsoever in our culture or in the growth of tribal culture.

        Secondly, I think I am right in saying that every University has a University Court and it is the University Court which more or less lays down the policy of the University. I think it should be our duty to point out to the Government of India when we forward our Resolution that the composition of the University Court should be in such a way that at no point of time tribal members would be overwhelmed by non-tribal members. Well, this is not to cast any reflection on our non-tribal friends, but I think it is very essential that in such matters as the running of this University, the tribal voice should be heard more than other voices. I will leave other matters to other speakers who may be more equipped with the knowledge as to how Universities are run.

        With these words, Sir, I support the Resolution.

Shri STANLEY D.D. NICHOLS ROY (Minister, Agriculture, etc) :- Sir, if there are no other members who want to speak, I would like to intervene before the Minister, Education gives a final reply. Mr. Speaker, since I was associated with the Committee which had been organised many years back to ask the Government of India to establish a University in these areas and since I was associated with some of the moves of those earlier dates I have taken a keen interest in this University and since I myself have been associated with the running of one or two educational institutions and colleges. I would like to say a few words on this Resolution. It has been pointed out that this University should have been established some year back. I may remind the House that the Government of India had appointed a Committee composed on members of the University Grants Commission and some members from the Hills areas of North-East India including representative from NEFA, Nagaland, Manipur and various hill areas of Assam to be members of that Committee. It was headed by a very eminent scholar from the rest of India and included the Vice-Chancellor of Gauhati University-at that time-Dr. Taylor. This Committee submitted its report as far back as 1965. Unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, all the members have not received a copy of that report, and at the outset, I would suggest to the Leader of the House or the Speaker to request the Government of India to provide all the members of this House with a copy of that report which gives a complete account of their findings and their recommendation. These recommendations were accepted by the Government of India and it was decided  to set up this University. Following this,- the Assam Assembly-passed a resolution referred to by my colleague the Minister of Education and it is not five years later that we have the opportunity of passing or placing before the House this resolution. Now ..........

Shri P. RIPPLE KYNDIAH :- May I rise on a point of information Mr. Speaker, Sir?

Mr. SPEAKER :- Yes?

Shri P. RIPPLE KYNDIAH :- Referring to what the Minister or Agriculture stated just not about the repot, as I cam in this House this morning. I was given a copy of it by a professor from Union Christian College.

Mr. SPEAKER :- In the Opinion o the Honourable Members that was merely the suggestion of one of the Members, Dr. Taylor. But the report of the whole Committee has not been received by any other members. But nevertheless. I hope those who were associated by any other members. But nevertheless, I hope those who were associated with the movement of the Hill University they were well aware of the recommendations.

Shri P. RIPPLE KYNDIAH :- Thank you, Sir.

Shri STANLEY D.D. NICHOLS ROY (Minister, Agriculture, etc) :- As I said, Mr. Speaker, Sir, a lot of thinking has been going on in the Minister of Education and our Members of Parliament representing the autonomous districts has been associated with the thinking and with the discussion that have been going on about this University, and I may also inform the House that some months back, as public leaders and in anticipation of the creation of this Hill State of Meghalaya we had taken it up with the Government of India and we requited them to take advance action. As a matter of fact they appointed a Committee to examine the report and start taking action for establishing the University in this area and among others, the Member of the Planning Commission for Science and Education Dr. Nag Choudhury was included in the Committee. As far as we know this Committee has not yet come to Shillong although they were due to come to the end of last year and we had pressed the member of the Planning Commission Dr. Nag Choudhury when he was here some weeks back to initiate immediate action especially in the light of the anticipated resolution being passed by this House. However so far as our State is concerned, I am sure that there is no one who would oppose this idea of setting up a University - which is long overdue and which is supposed to cater not only to the educational requirements of Meghalaya, then it would not come under the purview of the Parliament. It is for the reason that it was to cater to the needs of the hill areas of the whole of north east India, especially to the people who would be at a disadvantage in the other two Universities of North East India which would eventually function in the Assamese language. It is for that reason that the Central University was conceived. I would also like to say that the whole idea of setting up a Central University as contained in the report submitted by the Committee that I referred to earlier, was not only to have an ordinary University on the lines already established in the area but to have a different kind of University and the report contains some of the new ideas so that the University and the report contains some of the new ideas so that the University education would become a little more dynamic. It would take into consideration some of the needs of applying modern knowledge to ancient problems of the hill areas. Ancient in the sense that they are inherent in the geography and topography of the areas as different from the areas of the plains. There is one further aspect that I personally would like to mention as has been mentioned in the Governor's talk regarding the type of education. In so far as University education is concerned. I am sure that all of us see in the products of University education in India in general. The need of doing something more should be there and different from what has been done in the past. Of course, there are Universities all over India. Some turning out students with technological bias, some with agricultural bias and so on and so forth. But as rightly pointed our by Mr. Ripple Kyndiah the quality of our students coming out of the universities can be judged not only in a degree by the process of how they adapt themselves to the problems they face in society today.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Here again I would like to intervene. Actually the products of the universities are not entirely the fault of the university. It is the fault of the Government of Meghalaya has to have a say in the University, I would like the House to know in what way the university should function. It will be a central university but what will be the arrangement through which the Meghalaya Government can approach the Central Government so that the Central Government will give a chance to the Meghalaya Government.

Shri WILLIAMSON A. SANGMA (Chief Minister) :- At this stage is it not possible for the Government to give a clear picture. But we will take up the question with the Government of India.

Shri STANLEY D.D. NICHOLS ROY (Minister, Agriculture, etc) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, as correctly pointed out by my leader the Chief Minister, it will be the duty of the Government of Meghalaya to take up with the Central Government and work out what functions we will have. In so far as the running of this University is concerned obviously the people of this area will have much to say.

Shri P. RIPPLE KYNDIAH :- Just on a point of information, so that we can be very clear on the subject. Now this is not to change the resolution which I have supported. My idea in this Mr. Speaker, Sir, please bear with me; what the Chief Minister has just said regarding the Central Government. Now I was thinking that the views expressed by the members here might be helping the Government in the discussion which will eventually take place with the Government of India. I now remember that the Committee which was set up earlier was headed by Mr. Wadia. Was that committee of Dr. Wadia Mentioned by the Minister, Agriculture.

Shri WILLIAMSON A. SANGMA (Chief Minister) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, this is not a point of information.

Mr. SPEAKER :- The duty of the House is to express opinion so that if the Government of India requires the proceedings we will have to hand over the proceedings, so that the Government of India will understand our mind. In fact the mind of the people of the hill areas long before the coming Meghalaya had already demanded of this university. It would have come long ago but due to some technical difficulties that university could not come and we hope that with the passing of this resolution these difficulties will removed.

Shri S. D.D. NICHOLS ROY (Minister, Agriculture, etc) :- Mr. Speaker, the member asked for a point of information. But this is not point of information. the member had enough give his opinion. I would like to emphasise, Mr. Speaker, that at this stage it is merely an enabling resolution so that the Government of India can place a Bill before Parliament and at that stage certain discussions will take place and only after the Parliament has passed legislation then the actual setting up of the university will commence. So subsequent there will get ample opportunity for this House, for the Government of Meghalaya, the Education Department and various other agencies interested in the establishment of the universities to place certain ideas. So it is not necessary to place all our ideas, as if it is the last chance. I think the hon'ble members will have ample opportunity to discuss the various points raised. I thought I should intervene and prevent that idea that this is the only time to give this ideas. I am grateful that Mr. Kyndiah has taken the floor and placed certain ideas. There are some ideas that has been suggested by Mr. Duncan which we have noted and according to him the  purpose for establishing the university, more or less, is to encourage tribal culture and improve education. But it would not be correct to say that these are the only two aspects. However, the thought that we would be loaded by staff from outside and there would not be much scope for our educationist in the State, I think it is not quite correct. As a matter of fact to bring educationists from other parts of the country and other parts of the world is not so easy, as one would expect. I for one, Mr.  Speaker, and I am sure many of my colleague and members of the House would welcomed educationists from any part of the world to help us establish a university which may eventually become world renowned. If it is only to encounter tribal culture then certainly our scope for getting people from other place of the world will be limited. Mr. Speaker, Sir, Your are experienced and well versed in history. You will know that many, those who have taken considerable interest in the past one hundred years or more for tribal culture, written books on history and anthropology, have not unfortunately been the people of this area. So let us not be afraid of being flooded by educationist from other parts of the country.

Shri S.J. DUNCAN :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, my intention is that the Government of Meghalaya should have a say in the matter of administration and staff.

Mr. SPEAKER :- I think I must clarify. It appears to me that Mr. Duncan is in favour so that as the administrative side of the university is conferred should be staffed by the people of this area.

Shri S.J. DUNCAN :- Even in the matter of teaching Mr. Speaker, Sir.

Shri S. D.D. NICHOLS ROY (Minister, Agriculture, etc) :- However Mr. Speaker, Sir, I want to be clear that the policy of this Government which has been laid down is not parochial, is not extended to the educational field. In fact we want ideas people from all over the world to establish a university which will broaden the minds of the people. It will not only give us technical education but all kinds of education and from which our students will benefit. So, as I said earlier we would liken to attract educationists of high standing from various part of the country and from various parts of the world and I think it would be the intention of the Government as well. Perhaps our Government in discussing this matter will the Government of India will take all these into consideration. In fact, I am sure many other things will be taken into consideration is establishing the best type of university we want. I may inform the members that having been associated with some for the Committees as members in the year 1963-65 that there are many different types of universities being established all over the country and all over the world and we would like to have a special type of university to cater to the special requirements and perhaps more particularly not to forget the fundamental aspect of education, to teach our students how to think, how to think an grapple with the problems of the world they will  face as soon as they are through University life, because that aspect to teaching our students how to think and apply whatever knowledge is obtained at the University level, to apply it to the problems of daily life is, I think one of the fundamental aspects of education in that type of University because many experiments have been made in university education all over the world. 

        I recommend that this resolution be passed and the Government of Meghalaya would take up with the Government of India to establish it as soon as possible and to get the best minds on how to establish it and how to run it in the best way, in the best interest of the people here and the country as a whole.

Shri JOHNDENG POHRMEN, M.L.A. :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, may I ask an information on this subject? The Member who had just spoken has been closely associating with the proposed University and as such may he enlighten us as to how they do in other places in connection with the organisation of such Universities? I want to have some ideas and I think it would be better to speak on the issue in the House.

Mr. SPEAKER :- I think it needs a combined information between the Government of Assam and the Government of Meghalaya. There should be some modification and that modification in the University set up will have to be favoured through the process of negotiation between the Government of Meghalaya and Central Government. It is here to be moved and this is not a point of information at this stage. So will the Hon'ble Minister, Education describe it.

Shri SANDFORD MARAK (Minister, Education) :- Mr. Speaker, Sir, I am very grateful to the Hon'ble Members of the various suggestion given by them in support of the resolution. It is difficult to give effect to all the suggestion made by them. But I would mention for information of the Hon'ble Members that they mentioned two types of University-one is unitary type of University and the other is Federal.

Shri JOHNDENG POHRMEN :- But Mr. Speaker, Sir, we would like to have such a University quite a long time back. It is a Government University. We are grateful to the Government of India for the special kind of education. That kind of learning we want to have. So once again Mr. Speaker Sir, I am very grateful for the valuable suggestions and I give my full support to this resolution for establishing a Central University at Meghalaya.

Mr. SPEAKER :- Now I put the Resolution. The question is :

        "That whereas it is expedient that a Central University for the North Eastern Region of India should be established by the Union Government.

        And Whereas it is necessary for the Parliament to pass necessary legislation for establishing the aforesaid Central University :

        And Whereas the subject "Education including Universities" falls within entry 10 of part "A" of the Second Schedule to the Assam Re-organisation (Meghalaya) Act, 1969 :

        And whereas under Article 253(1) of the Constitution of India, it is necessary to pass a resolution desiring that the Parliament should legislate on the above subject.

        Now therefore, this Assembly is of opinion that in the interest of the proposed Central University to be set up by the Union Government Parliament may pas the requisite Legislation."

The question was adopted.


ADJOURNMENT

        The Assembly was then adjourned till 10 A.M. on Wednesday, the 22nd April, 1970.

H.C. HANDIQUE
Dated Shillong, Secretary
the 21st April 1970 Meghalaya Legislative Assembly

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